WINTERIZING THE GARDEN

Well, we didn’t get any rain – not a lick, drop or spit of rain.  Though it was certianly threatening for a time, the heavens just didn’t seem to open up over the urban homestead.

It’s going to get warmer over the next few days, but then there’s a chance of showers over the weekend.  Let’s hope we get some rain and soon.

Yesterday the raised beds got covered – no more pretty pictures and seeing what I like to describe as a green carpet.   While Justin rounded up the clothespins, Farmer D put up the hoops and together they put on the light fabric material to protect the crops from any upcoming frost.  Not to mention our neighbor’s pecan tree which drops loads of leaves onto our raised beds.  Wouldn’t bother us much, but since we are in business of selling young salad greens it’s a pain to cut the greens with a bunch of dried pecan leaves littering the beds.

The tomatoes are, surpisgingly, still growing and full of green and ripening tomatoes.   Yep, still eating fresh maters!  There’s even limas and beans still growing.   Funny how some years certain vegetables linger on through the cooler months while othes putter out.

Checking my inbox here…. maybe it was good that we covered the beds because…. there’s a

Cold Front Coming

We just got an email from a local gardener informing us that forecasters are predicting a “Rare 50 year Arctic Blast Sets Sights On Southern California” next week.   Brrr, sends shivers up my spine just thinking about it.  

With that news, I guess it’s official – winter is here. 

You can sense a change in the weather, the night air is colder.   A sharp cold that you can feel in your bones

As to our crops and garden well, all we can do is prepare for the worst, hope for best.   

So by next week we may be paid a visit by Jack, Jack Frost that is, and I may no longer gaze out at our beautiful green, lush tomatoes.

Comments(12)

  1. Tara says:

    Would love for you guys to do a post on how you build your planter covers. Like what kind of materials you use?

  2. Tara says:

    Would love for you guys to do a post on how you build your planter covers. Like what kind of materials you use?

  3. Shirley says:

    Why don’t Farmers D and J cover the tomatoes? Just wondering, didn’t give ours to Jack. We want them ourselves. Is there something else waiting to be put in that spot?

  4. Shirley says:

    Why don’t Farmers D and J cover the tomatoes? Just wondering, didn’t give ours to Jack. We want them ourselves. Is there something else waiting to be put in that spot?

  5. Karin says:

    I’d like to know how to build those covers too. I’m also curious, if the weather is warm, won’t things get too hot under the tent. Hmmm, better get something together for next week, though. Maybe straw?

  6. Karin says:

    I’d like to know how to build those covers too. I’m also curious, if the weather is warm, won’t things get too hot under the tent. Hmmm, better get something together for next week, though. Maybe straw?

  7. claire says:

    just about too cold here for anything, winter veg – sprouts, leeks and parsnips are still standing ready for eating. salads would have perished, even in the greenhouse but I didn’t get organised enough to get them going this year, previously have had lettuce in decenber from the greenhouse.
    its good to read your weekly menus, thanks for taking the time to do that.

  8. claire says:

    just about too cold here for anything, winter veg – sprouts, leeks and parsnips are still standing ready for eating. salads would have perished, even in the greenhouse but I didn’t get organised enough to get them going this year, previously have had lettuce in decenber from the greenhouse.
    its good to read your weekly menus, thanks for taking the time to do that.

  9. Sinfonian says:

    My hoop covers are coming in handy over the next few days here in Seattle. Expecting high winds, rain/snow and temps in the low 20s. Ouch! Just what my hoop covers were designed for. And heck, I love seeing the hoop covers in my garden. So what if I have to look inside to see what’s growing. That’s that fall/winter gardening is all about! Celebrate it that you can still garden under covers!

    I love your low covers. I used 10′ PVC pipe to create 4-5 foot high covers. Very easy to harvest under and I even have a trellis for my peas in there! I’m loving it. If only I knew that in winter growth grinds to a hault like a So Cal traffic jam. Should have planted more plants, earlier. Next year!

    Way to go on your continued production. That’s awesome.

  10. Sinfonian says:

    My hoop covers are coming in handy over the next few days here in Seattle. Expecting high winds, rain/snow and temps in the low 20s. Ouch! Just what my hoop covers were designed for. And heck, I love seeing the hoop covers in my garden. So what if I have to look inside to see what’s growing. That’s that fall/winter gardening is all about! Celebrate it that you can still garden under covers!

    I love your low covers. I used 10′ PVC pipe to create 4-5 foot high covers. Very easy to harvest under and I even have a trellis for my peas in there! I’m loving it. If only I knew that in winter growth grinds to a hault like a So Cal traffic jam. Should have planted more plants, earlier. Next year!

    Way to go on your continued production. That’s awesome.

  11. mary says:

    What gauge of wire are you using to build the hoops? Who is your supplier for the canopy fabric?

    I just added thes material to my Christmas wish list!

    🙂

  12. mary says:

    What gauge of wire are you using to build the hoops? Who is your supplier for the canopy fabric?

    I just added thes material to my Christmas wish list!

    🙂

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