WHAT’S GOING ON

It’s been an odd couple of days, shall I say why?  Can you guess?  It’s what’s been the single most talked about subject on this journal the whole year.  If you guess “weather” you are correct.

We went from being hot, to overcast and damp to cool and windy in a matter of days.  But as expected with this seesaw weather temperatures are going to bounce back up again.  We are beginning to tired of the incessant flip flop weather pattern that we can’t seem to shake.  What is Mother Nature trying to tell us I wonder?

Anyhow, weather aside the fall and winter garden is coming along nicely.  And we are baaaack in business.  Yes siree!  After having to tell our clients that we couldn’t supply them with salad last month, this week our popular salad mix was ready to harvest and our clients were indeed thrilled.  Not to mention we were happy too because it was getting a little scary there for a couple weeks when we had nothing to give to our clients and that meant no substantial income either.

‘HISTORY’ MEETS THE FUTURE

Sunday we spent a pleasant afternoon at the lovely Natural History Museum where PTF along with a few other local organization had a table and Farmer D was one of three guest speakers.

Slightly over 40 people attended the hour long presentation which included a pretty extensive power point that covered quite a few elements of the urban homestead.  Everyone that I talked with had nothing but positive feedback so that was very nice to hear.  Also LA36 was there to film the presentation and even the camera man was fired up after the presentation.   The organizer for the Sustainable Sunday event commented that they would like to have PTF back again sometime!   Even though these events are work for us,it’s great to see people’s eyes light up and get inspired.  Hey, if we can do it, or DID IT, they there’s no reason that others can’t follow in our footsteps – and many, many, many are!

Farmer D gives a power point presentation about urban homesteading

PTF’s table full of first hand information

PTF (left) hangs out with the dinosaurs

UPCOMING EVENTS

Don’t forget if you missed this event, there are two others happening in the month of November.

Next week don’t miss some homegrown food, fellowship and fun at CICLE & PTF Harvest Celebration.  Event is free and family friendly.

Then the following weekend, PTF host another one of it’s popular Film & Food Night.  That evenings screening will be the powerful and insightful documentary SHALL WE GATHER AT THE RIVER.

This is a perfect. must see documentary!  Especially right before Thanksgiving.

DOING IT ALL?

Some readers asked how we do “everything” and how we keep things “organized”

Well, first off we don’t DO everything.  The urban homestead still has unfinished projects (root cellar, tearing out the last of the concrete, finishing the back porch deck, compost toilet, etc)   I on the other hand, with all the work, my crafty side suffers.   And these last few months it’s suffered dreadfully.  With a full workload, I’m not able to concentrate on my knitting or sewing. So you see, we don’t and can’t do everything.  Something or some part of our life suffers.

As for organizing, well, I wish the well kept kitchen and pantry was true for other parts of the house.  I’m not saying that it’s messy but we are lacking space – space for PTF tabling stuff, outreach, files, etc, etc.  It’s getting a wee bit crowded.

What we find works with keeping things in semi organized state it “pick up or clean up as we go.”  What this means if I’m  sitting at my desk or walking through a room I pick up or tidy up as I go.  Now, honest to say, I’m not always good at following such advice but it does work and keeps the house from going into a big pile of messy chaos.   Another rule is “put things back in place.”  If you use something from the cupboards or drawers it’s a good habit put it back. That way you keep your home uncluttered because everything should have a place.

When you operate an urban homestead I would say the number one thing is organization.  Organization makes urban homesteading easier and with tidy yard and home it truly makes for a wonderful life.

CLARIFICATION

On the empty fridge which sent some of our readers into a tissy. The fridge is pimarirly used for business – keeping the picked produce cold until our clients or we deliver. The empty fridge was showing the LACK of processed or package food that we purchase sans our clients orders.  Ya’ll can calm down now. 😉

Comments(8)

  1. PhoenixJen says:

    OK – I’m thrilled to know that you guys aren’t perfect! I was beginning to worry =).

    You are absolutely right when you say organization is the key and doing small projects like picking stuff up as you move through the house or putting stuff away after you use it is critical (and something I’m working on myself). Another thing I’ve been working on is just not having too much STUFF – I working at parring down and giving it away to someone who can use it. Stuff and clutter OUT. Peace of mind IN!

    Having said that – it’s easier said than done. But it is getting done….slowly! I have declared my place an anti-stuff zone and specifically asked folks not to gift me with things that are not consumable or useful in some meaningful way. Mostly – I just don’t “need” the stuff I once thought I did.

    PhoenixJen

  2. PhoenixJen says:

    OK – I’m thrilled to know that you guys aren’t perfect! I was beginning to worry =).

    You are absolutely right when you say organization is the key and doing small projects like picking stuff up as you move through the house or putting stuff away after you use it is critical (and something I’m working on myself). Another thing I’ve been working on is just not having too much STUFF – I working at parring down and giving it away to someone who can use it. Stuff and clutter OUT. Peace of mind IN!

    Having said that – it’s easier said than done. But it is getting done….slowly! I have declared my place an anti-stuff zone and specifically asked folks not to gift me with things that are not consumable or useful in some meaningful way. Mostly – I just don’t “need” the stuff I once thought I did.

    PhoenixJen

  3. Amy in GA says:

    Okay, I confess that I have those moments of thinking “how the heck do they get all that done” when I read your journal, but just last week someone asked me the same thing! I didn’t think I was all that productive, but maybe that is all relative.

    I am pretty happy with the productivity of my garden this year, and it is always a pleasure to work on even when it isn’t yielding as much as I hope for, but the house, as you say, “it’s getting a wee bit crowded.”

    And in the big gardening times, not only the housework but also my sewing suffers. However, winter is on the way, and crafting time will expand soon. Hope it is soon enough for you! Creating new things can be a very important part of a life. Hope you get time/space for it soon.

    Amy in GA

  4. Amy in GA says:

    Okay, I confess that I have those moments of thinking “how the heck do they get all that done” when I read your journal, but just last week someone asked me the same thing! I didn’t think I was all that productive, but maybe that is all relative.

    I am pretty happy with the productivity of my garden this year, and it is always a pleasure to work on even when it isn’t yielding as much as I hope for, but the house, as you say, “it’s getting a wee bit crowded.”

    And in the big gardening times, not only the housework but also my sewing suffers. However, winter is on the way, and crafting time will expand soon. Hope it is soon enough for you! Creating new things can be a very important part of a life. Hope you get time/space for it soon.

    Amy in GA

  5. madeline duffin says:

    i wish calgary alberta canada had the same long growing season as LA does. my garden was put to bed at the end of september and wont be active again until may. but i get lots of inspiration and information on how to change my home, my garden and my family in how we can live more simply and create a revolution in a city where it is customary to have a car and 2000 square foot home. all i need to know now is how i can raise chickens in my back yard if it is against city bylaws? do you have any suggestions?

  6. madeline duffin says:

    i wish calgary alberta canada had the same long growing season as LA does. my garden was put to bed at the end of september and wont be active again until may. but i get lots of inspiration and information on how to change my home, my garden and my family in how we can live more simply and create a revolution in a city where it is customary to have a car and 2000 square foot home. all i need to know now is how i can raise chickens in my back yard if it is against city bylaws? do you have any suggestions?

  7. Amy says:

    If you see the most recent post on my blog you will see how timely your topic of organization is. I don’t do nearly as much as you all do but I do have small children and it is overwhelming. It is good to hear I’m not alone there.

  8. Amy says:

    If you see the most recent post on my blog you will see how timely your topic of organization is. I don’t do nearly as much as you all do but I do have small children and it is overwhelming. It is good to hear I’m not alone there.

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