WEEKLY MEAL WRAP UP x3

I admit, this is rather pathetic attempt at catching up to the last few weeks worth of eats.  In truth, it should be 4 weeks, but with outreach, Amy and other stuff I lost one week’s meal entirely!   We ate well from the garden,  but I just didn’t get a chance to write it down.  Oh well.

Actually this blog is not only our attempt in sharing our journey but it’s a way for us to keep track and document ours.   Like a public diary, our online book of sorts.  It’s a good source of reference for us as we look back on our journey.

These days I am always thinking, telling myself, that I will catch up.  I do hope so before being swept away by the tidal wave of “to dos.”

For you web savvy folks you can keep tabs with us on Facebook and Twitter where we are more apt to give you tidbits of urban homestead happenings

Cooking in the sun oven (sold on our online store)

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WEEK ONE

All food items are homemade/homegrown/home preserved unless otherwise specified

SATURDAY

Breakfast – pancakes with strawberry sauce
Dinner -potluck

SUNDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – leftovers from potluck
Dinner – leftovers from potluck

MONDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – leftovers from potluck
Dinner – nettle pesto with salad

TUESDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – radish, broccoli, pea stir fry
Dinner – avocado, squash pickle, raw cheese sandwich with coleslaw

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – green onion, peas, broccoli casserole with rice
Dinner – avocado, cucumber relish, raw cheese sandwich with coleslaw

THURSDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – steamed potatoes, broccoli, green onions and peas
Dinner -herb pizza dough topped with tomato sauce, pickled garlic, peppers and broccoli with salad

FRIDAY

Breakfast – skillet granola
Lunch – steamed potatoes, broccoli, green onions and peas
Dinner –  no knead bread, tomato sauce and pasta with salad

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WEEK TWO

All food items are homemade/homegrown/home preserved unless otherwise specified

SATURDAY

Breakfast – pancakes with strawberry sauce
Dinner – flour tortillas, spanish rice with organic black beans

SUNDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – leftovers
Dinner – leftovers

MONDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – steamed potatoes, broccoli, green onions and peas
Dinner – vegetable lasagna with salad

TUESDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – vegetable lasagna with salad
Dinner – vegetable lasagna with salad

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – steamed potatoes, broccoli, green onions and peas
Dinner -peas, pasta with lemon butter, herb sauce

THURSDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – out
Dinner – peas, pasta with lemon butter, herb sauce

FRIDAY

Breakfast – skillet granola
Lunch – peas, pasta with lemon butter, herb sauce
Dinner –  tomato sauce and pasta with salad

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WEEK THREE

All food items are homemade/homegrown/home preserved unless otherwise specified

SATURDAY

Breakfast – crepes with strawberry sauce
Dinner – flour tortillas, spanish rice with organic black beans

SUNDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – leftovers
Dinner – vegetable lasagna and salad

MONDAY

Breakfast – crepes with strawberry sauce
Lunch – vegetable lasagna and salad
Dinner – vegetable lasagna with salad

TUESDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – broccoli, carrots, peas casserole
Dinner – peas, pasta with lemon butter, herb sauce

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – out
Dinner – out

THURSDAY

Breakfast – fruit preserves & organic peanut butter on bread
Lunch – out
Dinner – herb pizza dough topped with tomato sauce, pickled garlic, peppers and broccoli with salad

FRIDAY

Breakfast – skillet granola
Lunch – out
Dinner –  no knead bread, tomato sauce and pasta with salad

Comments(13)

  1. Laura says:

    Those look great! We are finally in season to have some homegrown meals at our house. Nothing tastes better than something you’ve grown yourself.

  2. Laura @ Getting There says:

    This is off topic, but I really love those flowered plates. So pretty! 🙂

  3. Rachel says:

    I’m frustrated! While I find it intersting to read what’s going on on your homestead, I would really like to see you offer some instructions on how to get started. I don’t really see any practical advice. How do you build a raised bed? How do you lay out your beds and what do you plant together? What varieties of vegetables do you grow? Where do you get or how do you build trellises for the vining vegetables? What do you cook in the sun oven and how long do you cook it? HOw do you make a human powered blender? You suggest others should live more self-sufficent, low impact lives, but offer little actual help to do it. I understand if you delete this comment, but I can’t be the only one that would get alot more out of the site if it actually provided some instruction.

  4. Gillian says:

    I’m with Rachel. I look at your site every day to see the pictures of what you’re growing and making, and while I love the outdoor stuff I find the pictures of sloppy pasta meals disappointing – where is your PROTEIN? I was a vegetarian for ten years myself but now cook a mixed diet for my family. I wouldn’t offer them a vegetarian main meal without beans or lentils, and bread and jam for breakfast sounds like a poor start to the day, especially for a young man like Justin – does he pop out occasionally for a sneaky bacon sandwich? A couple of poached eggs on toast would be a start. For main meals you could try Boston baked beans, leaving out the bacon and using black-eye beans; chicken pie using butter beans intead of chicken; ratatouille with red kidney beans; chick peas with aubergines, onions and tomato (moussaka); soup made with onion, celery carrots and red lentils, with or without added sweetcorn, curry powder, herbs etc; green lentils with onion, mushrooms, red peppers and cabbage or broccoli.

  5. Mia says:

    I would like to comment as a long time reader to recent comments.

    Pics and “how to” have been shown before on the blog. You need to do your research to find it. If not there, there are certainly pics that show you.

    As for the meals, I think their point is to show how to reduce reliance on store bought goods, especially when the summer crops come in, thus the lack of “extras.” It’s called being frugal. And I notice they are very heavy on cheese which is included in every meal and that is an excellent source of protein.

    In winter, I notice their meals do contain more items like beans and store bought itmes becuase of the lack of variety in Nature at that time of year.

    As I always try to rmember, you need to understand where a person is coming from and what they are trying to accomplish. That tis the standard.

  6. Kelly says:

    @Rachel
    I think all that is required is to use our own imaginations and creativity. When you look for every answer outside of yourself, you will always be relying on someone else…
    This is showing you what IS possible… all you have to do is apply these ideas to your own living, in ways that suit you!

    @ Gillian
    None of these people look unhealthy to me! If we are listening to our hearts and our stomachs, they will tell us what food we require. No food pyramid can do that for you… we are all different. Enjoy your journey 🙂

  7. erin says:

    I have gotten some great info from this site, but most of all inspiration! Thanks!

  8. Rachel says:

    Kelly, The point of community is to share and pass on knowledge and skills, it’s what makes a culture – something America seems to have lost. I get inspiration everywhere, including this site; I need help with the practical part of it. Not everyone is able to spend alot of money and/or time experimenting and a picture isn’t going to tell me what’s involved with a project. They want people to follow a self sufficient, frugal path – they need to show people the way with actual skills. I’m having to look elsewhere. And BTW, I’m not looking outside of myself for every answer, just those that this family is an expert on and could easily provide more than pictures on.

  9. Chris says:

    Personally, I love the photos and greatly appreciate the weekly meal wrap-up descriptions. The vegan combinations are inspiring to me and just look absolutely delish! I find it refreshing to see various forms of homesteading as I pursue this journey. For example, the Dervaes family chooses to be vegan and live off mostly what they grown. Under Peddler’s Wagon there is a series of DVD’s from The West Ladies, who are not vegan, yet offer similar homesteading practices to the Dervaes family (ie. including fermented foods in their diets, canning, wide variety of homegrown fruits and vegetables, a positive attitude, hard work, a generous spirit in sharing ALL aspects of their homesteading knowledge, etc.) The West Ladies live on 90 acres (I believe and a family of 9) on the East Coast and the Dervaes family on 1/5 of an acre (a family of 4 on the West Coast) with countless new and experienced “homesteaders” in between. This is one site, with one homesteading family that has been doing this for 20 years and is self-taught, growing organically in small space using various garden methods, building soil via various composting methods (which is KEY), preserving organic seed integrity (which is HUGE), demonstrating water conservation and water harvesting methods (for their area a necessity) as it may end up being for all of America as Corporations buy up water rights to municipalities and towns. One homesteading family … one journey … one positive, inspiring and uplifting example illustrating “homesteading possibilities”. I am so grateful to have found this site! As I’ve begun to embark on this path, I am in AWE of how organized they are because the homesteading life is not for the trendy. It is a lifestyle choice that is very rewarding as long as you Commit to It. Like Farmer D says, you don’t have to do it all at once. Just start with one thing, then move on to the next. Thank You for all that you do!

  10. SimplyNaturalHomestead says:

    I love the solar oven idea. I plan to try that this summer. Have you ever tried insulated cooking? You bring the meal to a boil in a pot, then wrap it in insulating layers in a box, and leave it there (a few hours, all day, depends on the food). I’ve made beans that way–so easy, and it comes out tender and perfect, like in a crockpot, but using much less energy. I’ll have to do a post on it one of these days.

    I’d love to see some how-to posts too. I guess if they’re here somewhere, I need to look a little harder, lol.

    Your homestead is such an inspiration to me. Our goal is to raise as much of our food as we can, and eat as much raw as we can. Knowing you’re doing that, and selling a bunch too, really shows just what we can accomplish when we try!

    • kathryn says:

      I do this with many foods now, without actually needing to insulate them.

      bring eggs to a boil.cover.turn off heat..cooked in 20 minutes
      most vegetables..especially if cut small..same as eggs
      pasta…bring to boil, cover, turn off heat..usually 7 minutes
      rice…same as eggs

  11. James says:

    I noticed you have peanut butter bread almost every morning! That has been my staple breakfast my whole life! Mine is on toast though. What would lif be without Peanut butter:)

    • James says:

      @James, Wow, I should have read the posst before me! I guess I only noticed the peanut butter haha. I wish there was a little more info to but I still love the site! It’s all about the inspiration!

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