WEEKLY MEAL WRAP UP

Note this is not a photo accident.  We had the 007 Soup for three meals in a row!  😉

Sprouting seeds in our handy Food PANtrie

Last  week we enjoyed fresh homegrown broccoli.  Since we strive to eat low on the food chain with homegrown vegetables as our main food source this recent article shows that eating our greens is  good for us.  In winter and spring our garden is certainly full of vitamin rich greens.

Want Strong Bones? Eat More Greens

Fruits and vegetables are metabolized to bicarbonate and thus are alkali-producing. But the typical American diet is rich in protein (meat and dairy) and cereal grains that are metabolized to acid, and thus are acid-producing. With aging, such diets lead to a mild but slowly increasing metabolic “acidosis.” Read full article

New readers from MEN will notice that our meals are pretty simple – veggies and a few staple items like pasta, rice and grains.  Simple, peasant type meal.   Noticeably absent is meat.  We stopped eating meat back in late 1980’s for environmental reasons (at that time local beef and free range weren’t even a term)  A  recent article  in Scientific America shows that eating less meat is not only better for you health wise but it’s also good for the environment

Producing the annual beef diet of the average American emits as much greenhouse gas as a car driven more than 1,800 miles. Read full article

And here’s an interesting article about kids, dirt and that farm life builds immunity.  Just threw that into the mixed bag of news today.

Just some food for thought.  Now our weekly meal wrap up.  Enjoy

SATURDAY

Breakfast – homemade pancakes made with homeraised eggs
Dinner -homemade tortillas, spanish rice (homegrown tomatoes, peppers, green onions) with organic black beans and cheese

SUNDAY

Breakfast – homemade stove top granola made with homegrown honey
Lunch – leftovers from Saturday dinner
Dinner – homegrown broccoli local meyer lemon pasta with homegrown salad

MONDAY

Breakfast – homemade stove top granola made with homegrown honey
Lunch – 007 soup – homegrown broccoli, tomatoes, green onions, kale, peas, squash
Dinner – leftover soup

TUESDAY

Breakfast – homemade stove top granola made with homegrown honey
Dinner – leftover 007 soup – homegrown broccoli, tomatoes, green onions, kale, peas, squash with homemade organic cornbread
Lunch – homegrown broccoli local meyer lemon pasta with homegrown salad

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – homemade stove top granola made with homegrown honey
Lunch – homegrown broccoli with homegrown herb and local lemon butter with organic potatoes
Dinner – homegrown baked winter sqaush with homegrown salad

THURSDAY

Breakfast – homemade stove top granola made with homegrown honey
Lunch – homegrown broccoli with homegrown herb and local lemon butter with organic potatoes with leftover homegrown winter squash and leftover homemade corn bread
Dinner -homegrown salad greens, homemade herb pizza crust topped with homegrown tomatoes and canned marinated homegrown peppers

FRIDAY

Breakfast – homemade stove top granola made with homegrown honey
Lunch – homegrown broccoli and greens with CA organic rice and homemade raw cheese sauce
Dinner – homemade no knead bread, homegrown, preserved tomato sauce with organic whole wheat pasta and homegrown salad

Comments(10)

  1. Andrea says:

    I love the article on eating dirt! I posted on my blog recently about a similar article in the New York Times and my experience with 2 dirt-eating kids…my mother-in-law says my kids eat just the right amount of dirt LOL. The result is that my kids rarely get sick…maybe 2 headcolds a year, give or take. I’ve been blessed with a pair of keepers ; )

    http://chicky-bit-run.blogspot.com/2009/01/side-of-dirt-with-that.html

  2. Andrea says:

    By the way, can you tell us a little bit about your family’s decision to go vegetarian? You kids were fairly young then, so what did you think about the change? Was it all at once or over a period of time? Any suggestions for helping parents of young children make a slow transition?

  3. Shirley says:

    Ahhh … a large pot of soup in the winter is so comforting. The name of your 007 soup reminds me of Laura’s:

    Peas porridge hot
    Peas porridge cold
    Peas porridge in the pot
    Nine days old!

    Your soup looks good too. Glad to have an image to go with the name.

    On a different note, we’re not supposed to be below freezing for at least the next 2 weeks. We’re so happy! It was 38* on Miami a few nights back. The lowest temp in recorded history for that area. We were low 20’s here in north central FL. Our tomatoes and peppers were severley damaged under cover. They are still alive.

  4. Meg says:

    I love the 3X photo of the 007 Soup 😉 Gave me a chuckle this AM!

    I wanted to let you guys know that the US Postal service seems bound and determined that I am not supposed to get my Freedom Seeds, but I am going to do it! First, I put the envelope out for pickup at my home mailbox, and they didn’t pick it up. So then I walked the 1/4 mile to the closest pickup location and dropped the envelope with the seed order & check in the box there. It turns out that something happened to the envelope,as it arrived back home today in a plastic envelope with a “sorry, your mail was not delivered, here’s what’s left” notice….looks like it fell in a puddle or something!! Anyhow, I am BOUND and DETERMINED to place my order, and I figure 3rd time will be the charm, right? So I will be mailing my seed order again tomorrow. 🙂 The post office may not want me to get my peas, Russian Red Kale and Forellenschluss lettuce and all, but *I* want them, and I will get them! 😉

  5. Brian Gallimore says:

    What is in picture #5? Sprouts? I have no idea what that is, please let me know!

  6. Tracy says:

    Loved the article link – Let Them Eat Dirt! We have always said this in our family and it certainly seems true! I was born/raised/still live on a farm, exposed to lots of things, and I don’t have hardly any of the illnesses or allergies my co-workers (who live in the city) all seem to.

    One of my favorite sayings of my grandma – when I was helping her in the garden and we’d pick something that maybe had a little dirt on it — but instead of running it into the house to wash it first, she would just brush it off, hand it to us to eat and say, “Ah, it would take a peck of dirt to kill you!” LOL

  7. Susan says:

    And those greens are high in calcium to boot!

    I grew up HATING sprouts. Well, I bought a little sprouter at the local health food store, and I have discovered that they are actually pretty good when they’re fresh from the sprouter. They also make great chicken food (well, chicken candy anyway), and even our cats pick at them.

  8. Mary Hysong says:

    love the articel links! glad to know my intuition/innate knowledge is now ‘proved’ correct by science 😉 My kids all ate dirt, even had one little nudist take mud baths in a puddle in the front yard [right down to ‘washing’ her hair with the mud!] they ate red wigglers and unwashed produce, drank raw milk, home made yogurt and cheese made from said milk, and aside from the chicken pox never had a serious infection. they all 3 still have their tonsils, appendix and other frequently removed body parts! The oldest is almost 30 and the youngest is 24.

  9. Beth B says:

    Speaking of nutrition and health effects, I would be curious to know how your family’s teeth fair. We try to eat well and brush well. We even floss, but our citified family does love cookies etc and are plagued with cavities.

  10. Sherry says:

    I know you guys are busy, busy, busy with other things, but I thought I remembered reading somewhere that a cookbook is in the works. Any idea when or if we will see one? No pressure! 🙂

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