WEEKLY MEAL WRAP UP

Even though it feels like fall (for now) we are still enjoying fresh tomatoes and peppers from the garden.  Actually, Justin commented today that we are harvesting more tomatoes than we got all summer!  He’s right ya know, it’s been a terribly odd year. Summer still lingers on down on the farm.

As you can see after reading post after post of our weekly meals (what has it been a couple years now) you must have noticed that we keep meals and ingredients simple here at our little homestead in the city.  Over the years, we learned  as a modern pioneer one has to/should limit your pantry’s supplies and meal ingredients.  I know this sounds hard, but think about it, did Laura Ingalls have coconut milk or someone exotic sounding ingredient in her pantry?   Sure forcing ourselves into this mindset limits us from trying some wondrous vegetarian recipe that I spotted online or in a magazine at the health food store but it keeps our family’s food miles down to bare basic necessities.  Not that we have limited them all down — just yet.  We still LOVE chocolate, one of the vices of being born 1/2 Belgian, 1/4 French and 1/4 Spanish/Guatemalan.  Yeah, I know there’s carob – even local carob  growing but it’s just not the same.  Ah well.  One step at a time right?

Still, limiting our ingredients, one can make tasty and wholesome meals that everyone can enjoy.  So maybe I won’t be able to make banana cranberry bread any longer (truthfully haven’t in years since we started this project)  But the point is,  it’s all about eating seasonally and simply.   Even though you may come across a scrumptious recipe think to yourself “what would the Ingalls do-eat?”  Ma Ingalls fed and nourished her family without isles and isles of ingredients from all over the world.   So this holiday season, keep it local, simple.   You’ll not only find that your creative juices will start flowing but you may even save money.

So challenge yourself, take stock of your fridge, pantry, freezer contents and ask yourself “what would the Ingalls do.”  You may open up a whole new local world of wonders.

HG = Homegrown

SATURDAY

Breakfast – homemade pomegranate pancakes (made with HG eggs) and homegrown honey
Dinner – homemade tortillas with homemade spanish rice ( HG peppers, tomatoes) topped with HG sauteed peppers, tomatoes, cilantro and organic cheese

SUNDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch –  OUT (community event)
Dinner – letovers from Saturday’s dinner

MONDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch – HG lima beans and Ca organic rice with HG herbs
Dinner – HG veggies (beans, tomatoes, peppers, herbs) with CA organic rice

TUESDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Dinner – HG veggies (beans, tomatoes, peppers, herbs) with CA organic rice
Lunch – HG veggies (beans, tomatoes, peppers, herbs) with CA organic rice with HG baked tromboncino squash

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – homemade biscuits with HG, homemade preserves
Lunch – HG baked tromboncino squash, HG and homemade baked beans, HG salad greens
Dinner – HG and homemade baked beans with CA organic rice

THURSDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch – HG veggies (tomatoes, peppers, green onions) and pasta
Dinner -homemade pizza topped with HG peppers, eggplant, tomatoes and cheese with HG salad greens

FRIDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch – HG salad greens and HG lima beans
Dinner – HG salad greens, homemade no knead herbal bread, homemade tomato sauce (HG tomatoes, peppers, green onions, herbs) with organic whole wheat pasta topped with organic Parmesan cheese

Comments(18)

  1. anita says:

    Hi Anais,
    Your meals look so delicious and health giving. When you grow your own herbs and vegetables they’re filled with so much flavour you don’t have to rely on “additivies” to get that taste. As you are part french and beligium I can understand your longing for chocolate but I’m half irish/aussie and this girl still needs a fix of of this delicious treat so I really can’t use genetics to make sense of this!!
    Enjoy
    Anita

  2. anita says:

    Hi Anais,
    Your meals look so delicious and health giving. When you grow your own herbs and vegetables they’re filled with so much flavour you don’t have to rely on “additivies” to get that taste. As you are part french and beligium I can understand your longing for chocolate but I’m half irish/aussie and this girl still needs a fix of of this delicious treat so I really can’t use genetics to make sense of this!!
    Enjoy
    Anita

  3. kevin says:

    I can’t agree more. And I would like to point out that distance makes the heart grow fonder (or however that saying goes). I have never loved food more than when I had to wait for the season. I especially love the mushrooms this time of year. We don’t use a freezer, so the only time we can get great mushroom miso soup is in October, and it is amazing! I doubt I would enjoy it as much if we could make it all year round. The same goes for rasperries, perssimon, and bunch of other seasonal goodies.

    I am enjoying this years pop-corn crop several times a week, knowing that soon I will run out and be forced to eat pickled veggies through the winter (still good). To reduce my dependence on popcorn as my nightly snack, we are making the most of sunflowerseeds and mukago (a little fall potatoe)

  4. kevin says:

    I can’t agree more. And I would like to point out that distance makes the heart grow fonder (or however that saying goes). I have never loved food more than when I had to wait for the season. I especially love the mushrooms this time of year. We don’t use a freezer, so the only time we can get great mushroom miso soup is in October, and it is amazing! I doubt I would enjoy it as much if we could make it all year round. The same goes for rasperries, perssimon, and bunch of other seasonal goodies.

    I am enjoying this years pop-corn crop several times a week, knowing that soon I will run out and be forced to eat pickled veggies through the winter (still good). To reduce my dependence on popcorn as my nightly snack, we are making the most of sunflowerseeds and mukago (a little fall potatoe)

  5. Jan says:

    hey there,
    We went through the same thing with the tomatoes. We got out bountyful tomato crop late September. I am so glad we finally got them I was worried there for a while! YOur food photos look so very yummy!

  6. Jan says:

    hey there,
    We went through the same thing with the tomatoes. We got out bountyful tomato crop late September. I am so glad we finally got them I was worried there for a while! YOur food photos look so very yummy!

  7. Shirley says:

    Remember that after the hard winter the Ingles family were very glad to eat the food that came from back east in a barrel on the train. There are always special exceptions that are definitely not daily life. My children and I loved the little house books and I down right froze reading the hard winter in the middle of a scorching FL summer in an old metal trailer with no insulation and no air conditioning, that sat in the sun. It is amazing how powerful Laura’s memories were, and Rose’s rewording of them.

    Coconut milk is overrated. I am so glad your tomatoes are doing better.

  8. Shirley says:

    Remember that after the hard winter the Ingles family were very glad to eat the food that came from back east in a barrel on the train. There are always special exceptions that are definitely not daily life. My children and I loved the little house books and I down right froze reading the hard winter in the middle of a scorching FL summer in an old metal trailer with no insulation and no air conditioning, that sat in the sun. It is amazing how powerful Laura’s memories were, and Rose’s rewording of them.

    Coconut milk is overrated. I am so glad your tomatoes are doing better.

  9. Stacy says:

    I keep wondering how acorn meal will do as tortillas. Maybe I can convince the hubby to pull out his press this week…

  10. Stacy says:

    I keep wondering how acorn meal will do as tortillas. Maybe I can convince the hubby to pull out his press this week…

  11. Sandra says:

    Enjoyed your website very much! However, as a nutrionist, I wonder whether you get enough protien?
    Thank you.

  12. Sandra says:

    Enjoyed your website very much! However, as a nutrionist, I wonder whether you get enough protien?
    Thank you.

  13. Tracy from Kansas says:

    I just got done re-reading one of the Ingalls books the other day, and remember a section talking about them having “salt pork and potatoes” every day, almost every meal, for some of the winter months. We are definitely spoiled by our variety now.

    Just reading about those cold, cold winters on the plains, as she recounts them, makes me burrow into my warm quilts even further. 🙂

  14. Tracy from Kansas says:

    I just got done re-reading one of the Ingalls books the other day, and remember a section talking about them having “salt pork and potatoes” every day, almost every meal, for some of the winter months. We are definitely spoiled by our variety now.

    Just reading about those cold, cold winters on the plains, as she recounts them, makes me burrow into my warm quilts even further. 🙂

  15. Victoria says:

    My memory of the Little House books is a bit different – I recall that every opportunity they could to buy something a little exotic & different, they did. Like the canned oysters whenever they were celebrating, or canned peaches, or oranges, or lemonade (don’t think there would be too many lemon trees on the prairie). If Ma had had coconut milk available, and wanted to use it, I bet she would have.

    It might also be helpful to remember the health issues they had due to privations. So in all, I don’t think taking a romaticised view of the Ingalls family is a great basis for food choices today.

  16. Victoria says:

    My memory of the Little House books is a bit different – I recall that every opportunity they could to buy something a little exotic & different, they did. Like the canned oysters whenever they were celebrating, or canned peaches, or oranges, or lemonade (don’t think there would be too many lemon trees on the prairie). If Ma had had coconut milk available, and wanted to use it, I bet she would have.

    It might also be helpful to remember the health issues they had due to privations. So in all, I don’t think taking a romaticised view of the Ingalls family is a great basis for food choices today.

  17. heidi says:

    I am often in the Dominican Republic. There is a mountain village I visit that has two small solar panels to run a few lights, no running water, no stoves . . . you get the picture. The people living there are content with the simplicity of their lives. They grow coffee, plantains and a variety of root veggies, as well as chickens, ducks and a few pigs. They eat twice a day. Most meals are boiled plaintains and roots over an open fire, and strong coffee shared with friends. On occasion, someone in the village will slaughter a chicken and everyone feasts on a delicious stew. There is a sense of community in this lovely place that I’ve never seen anywhere else. It’s beautiful, and your posts remind me of it.

  18. heidi says:

    I am often in the Dominican Republic. There is a mountain village I visit that has two small solar panels to run a few lights, no running water, no stoves . . . you get the picture. The people living there are content with the simplicity of their lives. They grow coffee, plantains and a variety of root veggies, as well as chickens, ducks and a few pigs. They eat twice a day. Most meals are boiled plaintains and roots over an open fire, and strong coffee shared with friends. On occasion, someone in the village will slaughter a chicken and everyone feasts on a delicious stew. There is a sense of community in this lovely place that I’ve never seen anywhere else. It’s beautiful, and your posts remind me of it.

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