WEEKLY MEAL WRAP UP

With little or no surplus for our clients, we’ve been concentrating on just feeding ourselves and cutting back on unnecessary store bought food items.

We’ve cut out buying raw or organic milk (operation goat milk in the works, but that’s for another post) instead buying organic milk powder.  We don’t use much (‘cept for baking) or drink milk so with the urban homesteading going into rationing mode – powdered milk is, indeed, a money saver.

Since the garden in in the the ‘tween season (between fall and winter) it’s a good time to use up some of the bulk beans we have in the pantry.

We are still losing our some of our green crop to those darn harlequin bugs (never, ever had a problem with these bug — ever!)   The farmers here are trying everything neem, hot pepper to pyrethrum but still some make it through — those pesky buggers!  The rest of the salad greens are growing slooower than molasses!  What is up with this growing year anyhow?

With the urban homestead’s green shortage, we are forging the Arroyo Seco for goat food (also saves money stretching the animal feed & hay).  On our weekly walks we bring back bags of dried oak and sycamore leaves (which we like to call “goat chips” since our goaties love these leaves so much)

Our “depression era mode” is all about penny pitching, conserving and saving.  A sustainable life is not just about being green but saving green.

HG = Homegrown

SATURDAY

Breakfast – homemade pomegranate pancakes (made with HG eggs) and homegrown honey
Dinner – gathering at the ‘stead potluck

SUNDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch –  leftovers from Saturday’s potluck
Dinner – organic CA brown rice with HG vegetables (green beans, squash, peppers, tomatoes and herbs)

MONDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch – leftover rice and vegs from Sunday dinner
Dinner – vegetarian patty sandwich with HG lettuce and tomatoes

TUESDAY

Breakfast – homemade pomegranate pancakes (made with HG eggs) and homegrown honey
Dinner – homemade flour tortillas with homemade spanish rice (HG tomatoes, peppers) topped with HG sauteed peppers, cilantro and salsa (HG cilantro, jalapeno peppers, tomatoes) and organic cheese

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – homemade biscuits with HG, homemade preserves
Lunch – leftovers from Tuesday dinner
Dinner – homemade chili (HG tomatoes, peppers) topped with HG cilantro and organic cheese

THURSDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch – homemade chili (HG tomatoes, peppers) topped with HG cilantro and organic cheese
Dinner -leftover chili

FRIDAY

Breakfast – organic oatmeal and homegrown preserves
Lunch – leftover chili
Dinner – homemade tomato sauce (HG tomatoes, peppers, green onions, herbs) with organic whole wheat pasta topped with organic Parmesan cheese

Comments(46)

  1. Angela says:

    Your meals look great as usual! I am making chili tonight with local organic pinto beans that I was fortunate to buy in bulk (25#). Our permaculture guild combined orders and got free delivery, then a kind soul named John weighed out our orders. I also bought 25# of garbanzos. Your goat milk situation sounds like ours! We have two Pygmy does and just this morning had a “visiting gigolo” delivered in the form of a buck named (appropriately) Stanky Hanky Panky. He will be visiting for about six weeks to give his family’s does a break and hopefully give ours kids so that we can start milking the does in early spring. It was a little hard to find a buck, so we feel lucky. Now we have to see what happens…

  2. Angela says:

    Your meals look great as usual! I am making chili tonight with local organic pinto beans that I was fortunate to buy in bulk (25#). Our permaculture guild combined orders and got free delivery, then a kind soul named John weighed out our orders. I also bought 25# of garbanzos. Your goat milk situation sounds like ours! We have two Pygmy does and just this morning had a “visiting gigolo” delivered in the form of a buck named (appropriately) Stanky Hanky Panky. He will be visiting for about six weeks to give his family’s does a break and hopefully give ours kids so that we can start milking the does in early spring. It was a little hard to find a buck, so we feel lucky. Now we have to see what happens…

  3. Andrea says:

    I hear ya about the depression era mode. I’m doing what I can, but I feel like my husband and kids are fighting me every step of the way. He doesn’t pay the utilities or do the shopping each week, so I don’t think he understands it when I tell him that money just doesn’t go anywhere anymore.

    Thankfully (and mercifully) milk in our area has come down nearly 30% from what it was this summer. It hit 4$/gal but is back down to 2.75 after a low of 2.50. Don’t laugh at me when I tell you that I canned 7 gallons of it to have on hand for emergencies this winter. With 2 little ones in the house, milk is not an option.

    Has anyone else heard that Walmart, Krogers and a number of other chain stores have pledged to only use milk from non-bovine growth hormone treated animals for their private label dairy?? Yay for non-treated milk!

  4. Andrea says:

    I hear ya about the depression era mode. I’m doing what I can, but I feel like my husband and kids are fighting me every step of the way. He doesn’t pay the utilities or do the shopping each week, so I don’t think he understands it when I tell him that money just doesn’t go anywhere anymore.

    Thankfully (and mercifully) milk in our area has come down nearly 30% from what it was this summer. It hit 4$/gal but is back down to 2.75 after a low of 2.50. Don’t laugh at me when I tell you that I canned 7 gallons of it to have on hand for emergencies this winter. With 2 little ones in the house, milk is not an option.

    Has anyone else heard that Walmart, Krogers and a number of other chain stores have pledged to only use milk from non-bovine growth hormone treated animals for their private label dairy?? Yay for non-treated milk!

  5. Debbie Gemmill says:

    I have been blessed with a prolific pomegranate harvest from our wonderful bush this year. I’ve juiced and frozen 7 quarts of juice so far, with probably another 3-4 quarts in the works tomorrow. My plan is to turn some of into pom syrup for Christmas gifts–it’s great for pancakes/waffles but can also be used as a base for bbq sauces and glazes and other things. Do your pom pancakes involve just adding the seeds to the batter?
    Thank you for continuing to provide inspiration and practical ideas as we face challenging times. I love your statement–not panic, but persistance!

  6. Debbie Gemmill says:

    I have been blessed with a prolific pomegranate harvest from our wonderful bush this year. I’ve juiced and frozen 7 quarts of juice so far, with probably another 3-4 quarts in the works tomorrow. My plan is to turn some of into pom syrup for Christmas gifts–it’s great for pancakes/waffles but can also be used as a base for bbq sauces and glazes and other things. Do your pom pancakes involve just adding the seeds to the batter?
    Thank you for continuing to provide inspiration and practical ideas as we face challenging times. I love your statement–not panic, but persistance!

  7. Risa says:

    I know what you mean. Crazy year here too. Night time lows only went above 50 a few times, only rained once during the summer, and we got our first frost September 1st. On top of that I had to fly “home” to Hawaii to help care for my Father right in the middle of our 90 day frost free period. But we’re making do.

    I’ve been milking Pygmy goats for 4 or 5 years now. This year we managed to grow and forage most of the summer goat feed on our tiny 1/4 acre oasis in the desert. I got a couple of cuttings of “wheat grass” in the spring (for the goats) from the winter wheat before I let it go to seed (for us). Once the micro-pasture took off, I “cut and carried” pasture for them several times a day.

    When we lived where there were lots of trees our ladies loved “goat chips”too. Now we are completely surrounded by desert, but there are a few plants that can be fed to the goats. Wild sunflowers, wild amaranth, and tumbleweed. The tumbleweed and amaranth are great when they are young and tender (tumbleweed makes good soup too) but are EVIL (thorny) once they get older. BTW, Contrary to popular belief, tumbleweed is not native to the U.S. It’s from Russia! We’d just pull or cut them and throw them in the pen, by the next day there’s no sign of them.

    I also grow turnips, mangle beets, and pumpkins for them. Pumpkins are very low calorie so we don’t grow a lot for them, but the turnips and beets are close to grains in feed value. In fact, the goats don’t like the pumpkins as much as the turnips and beets. I bet the beets would do great in your mild winters.

    I love the mangles! They get huge, even in our short season. They give big roots, lots of meaty greens, and I use the stalks like celery. They don’t taste like celery, but they have the same crunchy texture. They are different than garden beets. But we all (people, goats, chickens, ducks, and pigs) eat some part of them.

    Not including the weeds we produced over 3000lbs (wet weight) in animal feed this year. The animals have provided us with 70+ gallons of grass fed milk (1/4 of that is heavy cream) and over 100lbs of grass fed meat. About 500 eggs ( fed grass and grains ). The garden was pitiful. I only managed to get half planted before my unexpected trip, and what got planted produced terrible. Just under 500lbs. There’s always next year.

    We love dairy products, but we don’t drink milk. We only drink water or tea. We don’t eat cold cereal either. Because of that we use a lot less milk than most. I’d rather turn it into yogurt or cheese than drink it. When the girls are dry we don’t buy dairy we adapt. Unless I have a surplus of milk I rarely use milk in baked goods. Most cakes etc. that call for milk I just use water. Things that call for buttermilk (like buttermilk biscuits) I use water with a little vinegar. If you can tell the difference it is subtle. After having a Jersey cow I came to believe that milk was used in baked goods and recipes because it was there not because it’s needed. Ten gallons a day can make you really creative. Take it from someone who knows. At one point I was making soap from skim milk and ghee. Just add lye.HaHa!

  8. Risa says:

    I know what you mean. Crazy year here too. Night time lows only went above 50 a few times, only rained once during the summer, and we got our first frost September 1st. On top of that I had to fly “home” to Hawaii to help care for my Father right in the middle of our 90 day frost free period. But we’re making do.

    I’ve been milking Pygmy goats for 4 or 5 years now. This year we managed to grow and forage most of the summer goat feed on our tiny 1/4 acre oasis in the desert. I got a couple of cuttings of “wheat grass” in the spring (for the goats) from the winter wheat before I let it go to seed (for us). Once the micro-pasture took off, I “cut and carried” pasture for them several times a day.

    When we lived where there were lots of trees our ladies loved “goat chips”too. Now we are completely surrounded by desert, but there are a few plants that can be fed to the goats. Wild sunflowers, wild amaranth, and tumbleweed. The tumbleweed and amaranth are great when they are young and tender (tumbleweed makes good soup too) but are EVIL (thorny) once they get older. BTW, Contrary to popular belief, tumbleweed is not native to the U.S. It’s from Russia! We’d just pull or cut them and throw them in the pen, by the next day there’s no sign of them.

    I also grow turnips, mangle beets, and pumpkins for them. Pumpkins are very low calorie so we don’t grow a lot for them, but the turnips and beets are close to grains in feed value. In fact, the goats don’t like the pumpkins as much as the turnips and beets. I bet the beets would do great in your mild winters.

    I love the mangles! They get huge, even in our short season. They give big roots, lots of meaty greens, and I use the stalks like celery. They don’t taste like celery, but they have the same crunchy texture. They are different than garden beets. But we all (people, goats, chickens, ducks, and pigs) eat some part of them.

    Not including the weeds we produced over 3000lbs (wet weight) in animal feed this year. The animals have provided us with 70+ gallons of grass fed milk (1/4 of that is heavy cream) and over 100lbs of grass fed meat. About 500 eggs ( fed grass and grains ). The garden was pitiful. I only managed to get half planted before my unexpected trip, and what got planted produced terrible. Just under 500lbs. There’s always next year.

    We love dairy products, but we don’t drink milk. We only drink water or tea. We don’t eat cold cereal either. Because of that we use a lot less milk than most. I’d rather turn it into yogurt or cheese than drink it. When the girls are dry we don’t buy dairy we adapt. Unless I have a surplus of milk I rarely use milk in baked goods. Most cakes etc. that call for milk I just use water. Things that call for buttermilk (like buttermilk biscuits) I use water with a little vinegar. If you can tell the difference it is subtle. After having a Jersey cow I came to believe that milk was used in baked goods and recipes because it was there not because it’s needed. Ten gallons a day can make you really creative. Take it from someone who knows. At one point I was making soap from skim milk and ghee. Just add lye.HaHa!

  9. Sinfonian says:

    Ouch, sorry to hear it’s still horrible. But I can relate to the slow growing right now. I expected my peas, cauliflower and lettuce to be MUCH bigger by now. However I just figured it was normal and just my ignorance talking, but now I know it is happening everywhere. Grrrr.

    Also sorry to hear that you’re having to cut back so much. Thankfully I have a steady job with a very secure company so as long as I continue to work my socks off, I should have a job and my family will be fine. Still we’re not doing anything extravagent, or eating out much, just to be safe.

    Best of luck to you!

  10. Sinfonian says:

    Ouch, sorry to hear it’s still horrible. But I can relate to the slow growing right now. I expected my peas, cauliflower and lettuce to be MUCH bigger by now. However I just figured it was normal and just my ignorance talking, but now I know it is happening everywhere. Grrrr.

    Also sorry to hear that you’re having to cut back so much. Thankfully I have a steady job with a very secure company so as long as I continue to work my socks off, I should have a job and my family will be fine. Still we’re not doing anything extravagent, or eating out much, just to be safe.

    Best of luck to you!

  11. Angela says:

    Risa, thanks for all the Pygmy goat info. We are pretty new to goat parenting, and are excited about the prospect of milking them. However, I am not sure that I will ever get used to the smell of the buck – ick! We are treating them all with “goat chips” until the rain starts on Friday and the “chips” get soggy. As I write this I am thinking that we should gather a few bags and store them for rainy day treats. How many Pygmies do you have?

  12. Angela says:

    Risa, thanks for all the Pygmy goat info. We are pretty new to goat parenting, and are excited about the prospect of milking them. However, I am not sure that I will ever get used to the smell of the buck – ick! We are treating them all with “goat chips” until the rain starts on Friday and the “chips” get soggy. As I write this I am thinking that we should gather a few bags and store them for rainy day treats. How many Pygmies do you have?

  13. Risa says:

    Hi Angela,

    Right now we have two does and a buck. We have had as many as 17 at once (five moms eleven babies and one dad).

    I agree, bucks are super icky. We live way out in the boonies so I try to keep a male for all our critters.

    Pygmy goats are really great micro-homestead animals. The milk is very clean and rich. The milk is higher in solids and fat, so you get more cheese and cream per gallon. You can easily get cream without a separator. When you make yogurt you don’t have to use dry milk to get a thick yogurt (sour cream too). And best of all the milk takes a lot longer to get “goaty” tasting. Dairy goat milk starts tasting “goaty” within a day or two. I have had Pygmy milk sit for two weeks without getting funky. It can actually be a problem if you like Feta cheese. My husband loves feta (I call it stinky cheese) but Pygmy milk resists stink Ha Ha! Even our jersey milk used to get “cowey” at about a week. There are a couple of tricks to getting cream and making cheese. Once you know them you’ll be eating like a king. I’d be happy to share, but I gotta run right now.

    Risa

  14. Risa says:

    Hi Angela,

    Right now we have two does and a buck. We have had as many as 17 at once (five moms eleven babies and one dad).

    I agree, bucks are super icky. We live way out in the boonies so I try to keep a male for all our critters.

    Pygmy goats are really great micro-homestead animals. The milk is very clean and rich. The milk is higher in solids and fat, so you get more cheese and cream per gallon. You can easily get cream without a separator. When you make yogurt you don’t have to use dry milk to get a thick yogurt (sour cream too). And best of all the milk takes a lot longer to get “goaty” tasting. Dairy goat milk starts tasting “goaty” within a day or two. I have had Pygmy milk sit for two weeks without getting funky. It can actually be a problem if you like Feta cheese. My husband loves feta (I call it stinky cheese) but Pygmy milk resists stink Ha Ha! Even our jersey milk used to get “cowey” at about a week. There are a couple of tricks to getting cream and making cheese. Once you know them you’ll be eating like a king. I’d be happy to share, but I gotta run right now.

    Risa

  15. Claudia says:

    Anais,
    FYI — Harlequin bugs (never, ever did I have a problem before this summer with these bugs!)
    Claudia, MN

  16. Claudia says:

    Anais,
    FYI — Harlequin bugs (never, ever did I have a problem before this summer with these bugs!)
    Claudia, MN

  17. Tracy from Kansas says:

    We just returned from a fabulous Feast (hope your family was able to take a few days off, too) – and I’m amazed at how many others I talk with are now also beginning to get interested in living off the land, planting gardens again when they haven’t in years, and becoming more self-sufficient. Met a lot of amazing people, gained many new ideas and also shared what we know with them. I also recommended your web site to several who would say “we live in the city, so we really don’t have room to grow anything” — I think if they see what you do, they will realize what is possible!

  18. Tracy from Kansas says:

    We just returned from a fabulous Feast (hope your family was able to take a few days off, too) – and I’m amazed at how many others I talk with are now also beginning to get interested in living off the land, planting gardens again when they haven’t in years, and becoming more self-sufficient. Met a lot of amazing people, gained many new ideas and also shared what we know with them. I also recommended your web site to several who would say “we live in the city, so we really don’t have room to grow anything” — I think if they see what you do, they will realize what is possible!

  19. Angela says:

    Thanks for the info, encouragement, and the tease Risa! Tracy, I am noticing the same thing. It is heartening to see how many people are taking first steps toward freedom. We live in a city and have a normal yard, so people often seem surprised by what we are attempting. This site is where I send them too.

  20. Angela says:

    Thanks for the info, encouragement, and the tease Risa! Tracy, I am noticing the same thing. It is heartening to see how many people are taking first steps toward freedom. We live in a city and have a normal yard, so people often seem surprised by what we are attempting. This site is where I send them too.

  21. Life Observer says:

    I’m afraid the economy is gonna get worse before it gets better.
    I think this is the the birth stage of some difficult times. Best to prepare now for it.

    A time of transition.
    Under-regulation of the economy & our lives is gonna give in the over-regulation of the econ & lour lives. All done with good intentions, of course.

    And, many families & our nation are presently in no condition to face a new, unexpected, major problem.

  22. Life Observer says:

    I’m afraid the economy is gonna get worse before it gets better.
    I think this is the the birth stage of some difficult times. Best to prepare now for it.

    A time of transition.
    Under-regulation of the economy & our lives is gonna give in the over-regulation of the econ & lour lives. All done with good intentions, of course.

    And, many families & our nation are presently in no condition to face a new, unexpected, major problem.

  23. ZipppityDooDah says:

    As always the food looks good enough to taste!

    Debbie: Have you ever tried making pom jelly? It is the most beautiful color I have ever seen. My dad gets juice by the gallon for me and throws it in to his freezer. If you need a recipe just pm me over at Freedom Gardeners and I’ll give it to you. My family has been making it for years.

  24. ZipppityDooDah says:

    As always the food looks good enough to taste!

    Debbie: Have you ever tried making pom jelly? It is the most beautiful color I have ever seen. My dad gets juice by the gallon for me and throws it in to his freezer. If you need a recipe just pm me over at Freedom Gardeners and I’ll give it to you. My family has been making it for years.

  25. Chris says:

    Goat chips? What is that? I also used to use the goat milk to supplement chicken feed. I figured if I could get the hen scratch, I would add the milk ( either fresh or curdled) to a bowl in their pen. They loved it and thier egg shell got thicker! I never had trouble with them being hungry or producing bad, either…. Keep up the good work! C

  26. Chris says:

    Goat chips? What is that? I also used to use the goat milk to supplement chicken feed. I figured if I could get the hen scratch, I would add the milk ( either fresh or curdled) to a bowl in their pen. They loved it and thier egg shell got thicker! I never had trouble with them being hungry or producing bad, either…. Keep up the good work! C

  27. Barbara says:

    Anais: I love your journal and have been so inspired by your life choices. Your meals look delicious, have you posted any recipes? I’d love to make some of your dishes.

  28. Barbara says:

    Anais: I love your journal and have been so inspired by your life choices. Your meals look delicious, have you posted any recipes? I’d love to make some of your dishes.

  29. Angela says:

    Chris, “goat chips” are dried leaves – they crunch like potato chips and goats seem to regard them as a great snack!

  30. Angela says:

    Chris, “goat chips” are dried leaves – they crunch like potato chips and goats seem to regard them as a great snack!

  31. Chris says:

    Oh gosh! That’s one I never heard! I’m finally in an area where you get leaves! Before it was Pines all the way, pretty much. I would imagine they would have so many minerals in them that goats could use! Thanks for the answer, I feel kind of stupid right now! LOL . … By the way, you can pretty much feed goats milk to any farm animal, and it would be good for them. My adopted daughter was having such a hard time with formula as a baby, that I tried all kinds of formula. Finally I started to feed her raw goats milk and she thrived! Her little cheeks got Rosy and her color got better all around. She just came alive so to speak! Love this site! God Bless You All, C

  32. Chris says:

    Oh gosh! That’s one I never heard! I’m finally in an area where you get leaves! Before it was Pines all the way, pretty much. I would imagine they would have so many minerals in them that goats could use! Thanks for the answer, I feel kind of stupid right now! LOL . … By the way, you can pretty much feed goats milk to any farm animal, and it would be good for them. My adopted daughter was having such a hard time with formula as a baby, that I tried all kinds of formula. Finally I started to feed her raw goats milk and she thrived! Her little cheeks got Rosy and her color got better all around. She just came alive so to speak! Love this site! God Bless You All, C

  33. Chris says:

    Oh gosh! That’s one I never heard! I’m finally in an area where you get leaves! Before it was Pines all the way, pretty much. I would imagine they would have so many minerals in them that goats could use! Thanks for the answer, I feel kind of stupid right now! LOL . … C

  34. Chris says:

    Oh gosh! That’s one I never heard! I’m finally in an area where you get leaves! Before it was Pines all the way, pretty much. I would imagine they would have so many minerals in them that goats could use! Thanks for the answer, I feel kind of stupid right now! LOL . … C

  35. Angela says:

    Chris, what state are you in? I wish that we were neighbors! What a lovely story about your baby daughter. This site is such a blessing in so many ways!

  36. Angela says:

    Chris, what state are you in? I wish that we were neighbors! What a lovely story about your baby daughter. This site is such a blessing in so many ways!

  37. Risa says:

    O.K. sorry about that. When produce season ends the meat harvest begins, and home school, and wood harvest, and etc.

    I’m going to try to explain this without seeming like a babbling idiot.

    Cream with Pygmy goat milk is the same as with fresh cows milk. It rises on its own, but there are ways to get the most out of it.

    If you have ever read the old time books they say “let settle in a shallow dish”. They know what they are talking about. You’d think it would make more sense to put it in a tall skinny jar and ladle off the cream like oil off the top of the turkey drippings. That’s what I thought. But, it’s not like liquid oil on top of water it’s actually thick, like sour cream floating on top. So you can scoop it off the top instead of ladling. So why not just scoop it off in a tall jar? Because, for some reason that “thick” layer of cream only goes about 1/4 of an inch deep and anything under it stays thin and liquid. If you put it in a wide shallow pan you get that same 1/4 inch layer over a larger area. With the right size pan you will have a perfect separation of thick frosting like layer of cream floating over nice skim milk. Surface area makes all the difference.

    To get a good separation let it sit in the shallow pans for 48 hours. If your equipment is clean 48 hours will not affect the quality of your milk.

    So here’s a run through my milking routine. I get my milker (It’s a maggidans hand milker) put together. Get a clean canning jar to milk into. A ring for the jar, a linen square for a filter (I try not to use any thing disposable), and a little wash rag. I set the linen square over the top of the jar push down in the center a little to make a cone and screw the ring over the top (instant filter). Never any hair in my milk. Then I get out my old 2 gallon milk tote (from when I had a cow) set the wash rag in the bottom then put about an inch or so of water in. I set the jar and milker in the water on top of the wash rag. The lid goes on and I bring it to a boil for a few minutes. All my equipment is sterile. I steam sterilize (I never use bleach) one rectangle two cup pyrex and lid for every pint I’ll be getting. I go out milk the girls. When I get in I take the filter off the milk jar pour it into the pyrex and put it in the fridge. I pull out the oldest cream settling containers skim the cream into one jar and the skim milk goes to another. For every pint of milk I bring in I get about 1/2 cup of cream.

    Ironically, I’m late for milking, so I gotta run again. Sorry

    Risa

  38. Risa says:

    O.K. sorry about that. When produce season ends the meat harvest begins, and home school, and wood harvest, and etc.

    I’m going to try to explain this without seeming like a babbling idiot.

    Cream with Pygmy goat milk is the same as with fresh cows milk. It rises on its own, but there are ways to get the most out of it.

    If you have ever read the old time books they say “let settle in a shallow dish”. They know what they are talking about. You’d think it would make more sense to put it in a tall skinny jar and ladle off the cream like oil off the top of the turkey drippings. That’s what I thought. But, it’s not like liquid oil on top of water it’s actually thick, like sour cream floating on top. So you can scoop it off the top instead of ladling. So why not just scoop it off in a tall jar? Because, for some reason that “thick” layer of cream only goes about 1/4 of an inch deep and anything under it stays thin and liquid. If you put it in a wide shallow pan you get that same 1/4 inch layer over a larger area. With the right size pan you will have a perfect separation of thick frosting like layer of cream floating over nice skim milk. Surface area makes all the difference.

    To get a good separation let it sit in the shallow pans for 48 hours. If your equipment is clean 48 hours will not affect the quality of your milk.

    So here’s a run through my milking routine. I get my milker (It’s a maggidans hand milker) put together. Get a clean canning jar to milk into. A ring for the jar, a linen square for a filter (I try not to use any thing disposable), and a little wash rag. I set the linen square over the top of the jar push down in the center a little to make a cone and screw the ring over the top (instant filter). Never any hair in my milk. Then I get out my old 2 gallon milk tote (from when I had a cow) set the wash rag in the bottom then put about an inch or so of water in. I set the jar and milker in the water on top of the wash rag. The lid goes on and I bring it to a boil for a few minutes. All my equipment is sterile. I steam sterilize (I never use bleach) one rectangle two cup pyrex and lid for every pint I’ll be getting. I go out milk the girls. When I get in I take the filter off the milk jar pour it into the pyrex and put it in the fridge. I pull out the oldest cream settling containers skim the cream into one jar and the skim milk goes to another. For every pint of milk I bring in I get about 1/2 cup of cream.

    Ironically, I’m late for milking, so I gotta run again. Sorry

    Risa

  39. Angela says:

    Brilliant! Thanks for taking the time to write this out. Now I am very excited about having milky does. I did observe our rent-a-buck doing his job with one of our does a little bit ago…

  40. Angela says:

    Brilliant! Thanks for taking the time to write this out. Now I am very excited about having milky does. I did observe our rent-a-buck doing his job with one of our does a little bit ago…

  41. Chris says:

    Angela,
    I live in Wisc. now, but used to live in the mountains of SD. Many call them the Black Hills! Lots of lovely memories. At this point, we have acquired land, but no buildings or animals yet. The garden was useless, needs just about every amendment. If Lord willing, I would like to do something about that, and get a well in and maybe a small shelter next spring. Time will tell. … What state are you from? Latter, C

  42. Chris says:

    Angela,
    I live in Wisc. now, but used to live in the mountains of SD. Many call them the Black Hills! Lots of lovely memories. At this point, we have acquired land, but no buildings or animals yet. The garden was useless, needs just about every amendment. If Lord willing, I would like to do something about that, and get a well in and maybe a small shelter next spring. Time will tell. … What state are you from? Latter, C

  43. Angela says:

    I am from Pasadena, CA, but we relocated to Eugene, OR early this summer. Congrats on your land — I hope that you are able to get what you need to get it all up and running for you. That is exciting!

  44. Angela says:

    I am from Pasadena, CA, but we relocated to Eugene, OR early this summer. Congrats on your land — I hope that you are able to get what you need to get it all up and running for you. That is exciting!

  45. Chris says:

    Angela,
    Are you living in the country, or in town? Do you have animals? OR is a beautiful state! I don’t know how to contact you without giving my address to whoever reads this letter? I’m not that savy about computers, as you probably can see. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks, C

  46. Chris says:

    Angela,
    Are you living in the country, or in town? Do you have animals? OR is a beautiful state! I don’t know how to contact you without giving my address to whoever reads this letter? I’m not that savy about computers, as you probably can see. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks, C

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