WACKED OUT WEATHER

July is feeling more and more like June.

Like we mentioned before everything’s off kilter about a month.  And you know what that means – wacked out bugs and vegetables who don’t have a clue what to make of the unseasonable weather pattern.   Also it means we are a month behind in our harvest tally.  What we normally harvest in July is similar to previous June totals.  July is when the harvest normally starts to peak and yet, this year it’s slower than normal.

So I guess that means August harvest tally will be more like July and so forth.  Of course this harvest pattern will mean that come December we’ll be a month behind so this could really affect our harvest tally this year.  It may help to have summer crops one month longer, although that means it may hurt the November and December harvest tally.

As a cooler than normal July comes to a close, it’ll be interesting to see how August and everything after develops.

Comments(10)

  1. Jan says:

    I feel your pain. I have longed for a ripe tomato. Up to date I have had 3 ripe and all yellow. The bad thing is that I have not one jar of tomato sauce in the pantry but on the up side, the long tomato canning process will come as the kids will be going back to school shortly. So that means all day canning till they return from school.

  2. Jan says:

    I feel your pain. I have longed for a ripe tomato. Up to date I have had 3 ripe and all yellow. The bad thing is that I have not one jar of tomato sauce in the pantry but on the up side, the long tomato canning process will come as the kids will be going back to school shortly. So that means all day canning till they return from school.

  3. Tracey Tiret says:

    Portland OR is the same story. Our blueberries are confused; I’ll keep you posted…

  4. Tracey Tiret says:

    Portland OR is the same story. Our blueberries are confused; I’ll keep you posted…

  5. Lizz says:

    August and everything after…was on my mind today as well!

    Bless~

  6. Lizz says:

    August and everything after…was on my mind today as well!

    Bless~

  7. Theresa says:

    I am having the same problem here in MI. We had a late hard frost on May 27th which is almost unheard of here. I had to replant almost all of my plants and start over. Fortunately, I had alot of volunteer heirloom tomato plants that came up from last year. Everything is starting to produce now but we are about 3-4 weeks behind last year yields. I am hoping for a late frost here to make up for it.

  8. Theresa says:

    I am having the same problem here in MI. We had a late hard frost on May 27th which is almost unheard of here. I had to replant almost all of my plants and start over. Fortunately, I had alot of volunteer heirloom tomato plants that came up from last year. Everything is starting to produce now but we are about 3-4 weeks behind last year yields. I am hoping for a late frost here to make up for it.

  9. Sinfonian says:

    I know what you mean about the weather. It’s not even August and we’ve been having several days worth of late September weather. Overcast, showers, lower to mid 60s. Few sun breaks. Grrr. I’ve got tomatoes, corn, beans, cucumbers and cantaloupe to mature!

    People say with how cold it is, how can we have global warming? I say it’s causing the icecaps to melt, which adds near freezing water to the oceans at alarming rates, which translates into colder water being circulated into the weather cycle. That’s how we get colder temps with global warming. I’m no expert, but that makes sense to me. I just hope for the best with my warm weather crops, hehe.

  10. Sinfonian says:

    I know what you mean about the weather. It’s not even August and we’ve been having several days worth of late September weather. Overcast, showers, lower to mid 60s. Few sun breaks. Grrr. I’ve got tomatoes, corn, beans, cucumbers and cantaloupe to mature!

    People say with how cold it is, how can we have global warming? I say it’s causing the icecaps to melt, which adds near freezing water to the oceans at alarming rates, which translates into colder water being circulated into the weather cycle. That’s how we get colder temps with global warming. I’m no expert, but that makes sense to me. I just hope for the best with my warm weather crops, hehe.

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