TINKERING


We’ve been getting mysterious packages in the mail recently and I’ve spotted some unusual looking gadgets in Justin’s room.  Yeah, I’m a nosy nelly.

Since our produce business is almost none existent at the moment ( no surplus no business – no thanks to the batty weather), Justin has a little bit of free time on his hands and he’s been busy tinkering with some new projects that will further PTF along the path of self reliance.

Though money is tight , Justin, who only owns one pair of shoes to his name (he’s one frugal guy, wearing out his clothes and shoes), figures with his bit of extra time it’s worth investing in the future and his education.  Farmer D, a former high school and college teacher, always stresses that the best education anyone can get is hands on experience and tinkering and encourages us to forge new paths.

At the lunch table last week it was suggested to Justin that he should start getting the word out about his bicycle repair skills.  Justin, who loves bikes, has been taking apart and fixing bikes for over a decade.

We figured with high gas prices, trouble economy and more folks getting bikes that he’s skills would be needed and could generate a bit of income or barterable trade.   Justin’s always wanted a small bike repair business and since gardening (his first love) takes up much of his daylight hours, he figures could work on bikes in the evenings — that is, if we clear a bit of room in the garage.  Space is rarer than hens teeth here on the urban homestead, but I think we could reorganize a bit.    There’s always a way.

We each have to do our part during hard times.   The urban homestead, just like everyone else these days, is going through a bit of a rough patch right now since the produce business has dried up due to little or no surplus and online sales have dropped due to the jittery economy.   There’s no panic, just persistence. We’ve come to learn that it’s all about being flexible, adjusting and looking for ways to get by.

In the meantime, we all look forward to seeing what Justin is up to and maybe he can take time to write here at LHITC about his latest projects.  Hey, Justin, if you are reading this, we like to know what you are up to – care to share?  We are all dying to know what you are up to.

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Comments(4)

  1. Kerr says:

    On the Peddler’s Wagon the photo for the Tulsi Hybrid Sun Oven is a nice-looking, but not very appetizing, compost toilet. May want to fix that. 🙂

    Best of luck, Justin, and Dervaes family!

  2. Kerr says:

    On the Peddler’s Wagon the photo for the Tulsi Hybrid Sun Oven is a nice-looking, but not very appetizing, compost toilet. May want to fix that. 🙂

    Best of luck, Justin, and Dervaes family!

  3. Wil says:

    The first picture looks like the housing of a Hydrogen Generator for a car engine. That would be cool.

    Wil

  4. Wil says:

    The first picture looks like the housing of a Hydrogen Generator for a car engine. That would be cool.

    Wil

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