THERE IS A SEASON

Prunning fruit trees

Bed of young snow peas

The last of the summer crops, tomatoes, peppers, beans and squash and a few volunteer sunflowers

In what’s seems like overnight the gardens’ taken on a whole new feel.  The towering bean vines and squashes are slowing coming down giving way to cooler weather crops like broccoli and peas.

Even the weather has heralded a new season.  The wind!  A few days ago the wicked Santa Ana winds came howling down through the passes like a freight train whipping trees and bushes in every which way. The lovely banana tree that grows near the outdoor solar shower beautiful leaves now look all raggedy and shredded to pieces.  Poor things.  Good thing our goaties LOVE banana leaves.

In the garden

We are turning are focus in not only growing our annual cash crops like salad mix, kale, swiss chard, pea shoots and edible flower but more about feeding ourselves.

Growing our food closer to home during these tumultuous times is growing a secure future for ourselves and our community. So perhaps this year we’ll be cutting back on a few of our “lightweight” cash crops and focusing on a few heavy weight vegetables instead.  These last couple day have meant long hours in the garden – pruning, composting and turning over the old and in with the new.

Looking back on the summer’s pathetic growing season we await a new season with hope and uncertainty.  Uncertainty on what the weather holds for us this year.  Will it be too dry or too cold a winter remains to be seen.

With such a small property it doesn’t leave much room for mistakes and when you put in your crops for the season you put along a bit of faith along with each seed.

:: Field Hand Appreciation :: GM $10 donation.  Thank you very much for your continued and most generous support.

Comments(4)

  1. BessieJoy says:

    When you say long days, how many hours are you talking about? I’m just wondering during your busy season what your schedule looks like.

    Because of the expected hard times ahead, are you working harder, or just very thankful the way you always live?

    Thank you for taking the time to share with us!

  2. BessieJoy says:

    When you say long days, how many hours are you talking about? I’m just wondering during your busy season what your schedule looks like.

    Because of the expected hard times ahead, are you working harder, or just very thankful the way you always live?

    Thank you for taking the time to share with us!

  3. PhoenixJen says:

    I know just how you feel. Last weekend I took out the rest of the melons, tomatillos (which produced thousands and thousands of flowers for months but not a single fruit!) and trimmed back all the deciduous fruit trees. In went the cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, garbonzo beans (as legumacious groundcover for the above cabbage family bed), garlic, onions, carrots, radishes and snap peas.

    Meanwhile growing happily in soil blocks I made using a block maker I ordered from you all are the second round of broc/cauli, spinach, lettuce, celery, collards, chard, garlic chives, favas, tomatoes (who will live out the winter in the propogation area), flowers, and shelling peas.

    Tomorrow I will plant more trays for friends who are getting a late start on their gardens – at least they’ll have a few starts of things to get things going while their seeds take hold.

    Eggplant, okra and basil are still going full blast – I am the “eggplant whisperer” – I will pull pounds and pounds of them off a few little plants until they finally freeze back in Dec. Whew! Got a lot of eggplant to slice and prep for parmasan and freeze. (Thanks to the wonderful recipe provided by the kind folks at: http://thyhandhathprovided.blogspot.com/2008/09/eggplant-and-beets.html)

    I sense pickled okra will be in my future….

  4. PhoenixJen says:

    I know just how you feel. Last weekend I took out the rest of the melons, tomatillos (which produced thousands and thousands of flowers for months but not a single fruit!) and trimmed back all the deciduous fruit trees. In went the cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, garbonzo beans (as legumacious groundcover for the above cabbage family bed), garlic, onions, carrots, radishes and snap peas.

    Meanwhile growing happily in soil blocks I made using a block maker I ordered from you all are the second round of broc/cauli, spinach, lettuce, celery, collards, chard, garlic chives, favas, tomatoes (who will live out the winter in the propogation area), flowers, and shelling peas.

    Tomorrow I will plant more trays for friends who are getting a late start on their gardens – at least they’ll have a few starts of things to get things going while their seeds take hold.

    Eggplant, okra and basil are still going full blast – I am the “eggplant whisperer” – I will pull pounds and pounds of them off a few little plants until they finally freeze back in Dec. Whew! Got a lot of eggplant to slice and prep for parmasan and freeze. (Thanks to the wonderful recipe provided by the kind folks at: http://thyhandhathprovided.blogspot.com/2008/09/eggplant-and-beets.html)

    I sense pickled okra will be in my future….

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