PRESERVATION FRONT

Hey all you Harvest Keepers!  How’s your preservation efforts going?  The urban homestead kitchen is preservation central these days, which, I am sure yours are too.  These a wonderful kindred connection knowing that there are so many folks these days growing and preserving their own – motivating each other while obtaining back to basic skills necessary for urban self sufficiency.

Can What You Can

Yesterday, put up some pickled green beans (homegrown), apple (homegrown) butter, strawberry (homegrown) preserve.

Today tackling some plum (local crop swap) preserves and elderberry (homegrown) preserves.

We use a simple, water bath canning method which is simply described here.  Afterwards I use the hot water to wash all the dirty dishes (and there’s certainly a lot after a whole afternoon of canning that’s for sure!)

Preservation central – it’s jammin time. Ya mon.

Canning essentials – lids, funnel, food mill, jar lifter (want yer own?)

Jordanne puts in the spices into the jars of fresh green beans

Hand cranking apple sauce for apple butter.  Thanks to a bumper crop of Anna apples here on the ‘stead.

Round and round and round she goes where she stops nobody knows….

Out come the jars from their hot water bath

Jars, jars and more jars of homegrown goodies. Don’t you just love the ‘popping’ sound as the jars cool.  Means a jar well-sealed.

Beans up close and personal – happy pickling!

An afternoon’s worth of work.   Stocking up for fall and winter time.

Another preservation day going on as we speak…

Comments(42)

  1. mary says:

    Any chance you could share your recipe for the pickled green beans?

    We’ve been eating our beans as fast as they are picked – but there are new blooms on my second planting so I’d like to put some back for the winter.

    I’ve been working on drying and/or freezing herbs this week. Just picked my Indian corn that we planted to use for corn meal. I tried Aztec Black – very pretty!

  2. mary says:

    Any chance you could share your recipe for the pickled green beans?

    We’ve been eating our beans as fast as they are picked – but there are new blooms on my second planting so I’d like to put some back for the winter.

    I’ve been working on drying and/or freezing herbs this week. Just picked my Indian corn that we planted to use for corn meal. I tried Aztec Black – very pretty!

  3. Tracy from Kansas says:

    I was wondering why you were “hot water bath” canning green beans (instead of pressure canning)– but now I see it is because you are pickling them.

    It all looks wonderful. I know it is hot work; but will be worth it when you eat them in the off-season.

  4. Tracy from Kansas says:

    I was wondering why you were “hot water bath” canning green beans (instead of pressure canning)– but now I see it is because you are pickling them.

    It all looks wonderful. I know it is hot work; but will be worth it when you eat them in the off-season.

  5. Marci says:

    Our harvest has just really started. I have baby green beans. We have gotten about 10 zucchinis. I will be dehydrating some of those. I have over 100 cloves of garlic drying under the shed roof. I also dehydrated some onions, but they weren’t home grown as I can’t seem to get a decent onion to grow. We hope to put up beans and corn. It will be a little while yet. What seasonings do you put in with your green beans?

    http://amazinggrazefarm.blogspot.com

  6. Marci says:

    Our harvest has just really started. I have baby green beans. We have gotten about 10 zucchinis. I will be dehydrating some of those. I have over 100 cloves of garlic drying under the shed roof. I also dehydrated some onions, but they weren’t home grown as I can’t seem to get a decent onion to grow. We hope to put up beans and corn. It will be a little while yet. What seasonings do you put in with your green beans?

    http://amazinggrazefarm.blogspot.com

  7. Ellen Christian says:

    We are having a really bad year this year for our gardens & produce. We’ve been having way too much rain and not enough sun. I’m hoping for an improvement so I can have the chance to put something up 🙂

  8. Ellen Christian says:

    We are having a really bad year this year for our gardens & produce. We’ve been having way too much rain and not enough sun. I’m hoping for an improvement so I can have the chance to put something up 🙂

  9. Lori from Michigan says:

    Hi Anais,

    I just found your website a couple of weeks ago and have become completely enthralled. Love what you are doing.

    My husband and I are newbies, having just put in our first front yard veggie garden this year. Hoping to use the quieter winter months to study up on gardening and methods of food preservation, and make a stronger effort next summer in providing for ourselves. Good stuff for our eleven year old daughter to learn, too.

    Your jars of food look lovely. We bought some pickled garlic cloves at a farm up north a couple of days ago. Munching them just about sends us to heaven.

  10. Lori from Michigan says:

    Hi Anais,

    I just found your website a couple of weeks ago and have become completely enthralled. Love what you are doing.

    My husband and I are newbies, having just put in our first front yard veggie garden this year. Hoping to use the quieter winter months to study up on gardening and methods of food preservation, and make a stronger effort next summer in providing for ourselves. Good stuff for our eleven year old daughter to learn, too.

    Your jars of food look lovely. We bought some pickled garlic cloves at a farm up north a couple of days ago. Munching them just about sends us to heaven.

  11. Taylor says:

    I’d like to second the request for the pickled green beans. We’ve got a surprisingly abundant crop this year so I’d like to put some away.

  12. Taylor says:

    I’d like to second the request for the pickled green beans. We’ve got a surprisingly abundant crop this year so I’d like to put some away.

  13. Terry says:

    Here in Michigan I don’t have anything to harvest yet! I was a little late in the game, this being my first year for vegetable gardening and I kind of did it at the spur of the moment when all the tomato scares started. I have some cucumbers coming up in various sizes, but doesn’t look like enough to do anything with other than use in salads for now. My beans are making lots of leaves, but no beans yet 🙁 Some green tomatoes…two teeny tiny baby watermelons.

    But I am learning a lot for next year. Your site is so inspirational, I am jealous of your year long ability to grow things in your yard. Although, I did live in SoCal for 3 years and I sure don’t envy your water shortages.

  14. Terry says:

    Here in Michigan I don’t have anything to harvest yet! I was a little late in the game, this being my first year for vegetable gardening and I kind of did it at the spur of the moment when all the tomato scares started. I have some cucumbers coming up in various sizes, but doesn’t look like enough to do anything with other than use in salads for now. My beans are making lots of leaves, but no beans yet 🙁 Some green tomatoes…two teeny tiny baby watermelons.

    But I am learning a lot for next year. Your site is so inspirational, I am jealous of your year long ability to grow things in your yard. Although, I did live in SoCal for 3 years and I sure don’t envy your water shortages.

  15. Stacy says:

    7 gallons of plum jam. We’ve also got some outside drying into prunes (an experiment). And I’ve been carting fresh ones wherever I can – though the tree is now stripped so this week is the last of the fresh.

    I’ve got one box of jam already “dibbed” by a friend in the Bronx (her four half pints last year only lasted a week), another box went to my dentist’s office the week after I brought them a huge bowl of fresh plums (if they’re going to recommend fewer sweets, they can darn well help get them out of my cupboard!), another box is promised to church’s food pantry, and various friends and family have gotten jars here and there and are now (for the first time in years) clamoring for more. I keep finding myself nervous about running out, and then I check my numbers again and realize how much I’ve still got… I do keep meaning to drop some by your place on my way to the in-laws in Altadena.

    I’m still “growing dirt” with regards to veggies (and hence my pressure cooker staying dormant) but we’re eating the in-laws spare zucch’s and tomatoes with gusto!

  16. Stacy says:

    7 gallons of plum jam. We’ve also got some outside drying into prunes (an experiment). And I’ve been carting fresh ones wherever I can – though the tree is now stripped so this week is the last of the fresh.

    I’ve got one box of jam already “dibbed” by a friend in the Bronx (her four half pints last year only lasted a week), another box went to my dentist’s office the week after I brought them a huge bowl of fresh plums (if they’re going to recommend fewer sweets, they can darn well help get them out of my cupboard!), another box is promised to church’s food pantry, and various friends and family have gotten jars here and there and are now (for the first time in years) clamoring for more. I keep finding myself nervous about running out, and then I check my numbers again and realize how much I’ve still got… I do keep meaning to drop some by your place on my way to the in-laws in Altadena.

    I’m still “growing dirt” with regards to veggies (and hence my pressure cooker staying dormant) but we’re eating the in-laws spare zucch’s and tomatoes with gusto!

  17. Karen H. says:

    We dry a lot of Anna apples every year, and decided to try drying crookneck and zucchini squash rounds, as chips to eat with the salsa we’ll hopefully make with our own tomatoes (slow this year), jalapenos and onions next month. Might taste good, and alot less calories than tortilla chips. I would also like to try making apple butter from our applesauce; I saw a recipe that uses a crockpot overnight to reduce the applesauce; I wanted to try that method. I love reading any and all of your homegrown/homemade food posts!

  18. Karen H. says:

    We dry a lot of Anna apples every year, and decided to try drying crookneck and zucchini squash rounds, as chips to eat with the salsa we’ll hopefully make with our own tomatoes (slow this year), jalapenos and onions next month. Might taste good, and alot less calories than tortilla chips. I would also like to try making apple butter from our applesauce; I saw a recipe that uses a crockpot overnight to reduce the applesauce; I wanted to try that method. I love reading any and all of your homegrown/homemade food posts!

  19. Andrea says:

    Could I third that pickled bean recipe request??? I can’t find my grandma’s and I’m certain yours is delish!!!

  20. Andrea says:

    Could I third that pickled bean recipe request??? I can’t find my grandma’s and I’m certain yours is delish!!!

  21. Laura @ Laura Williams' Musings says:

    Pickled Green Beans are so gooood! Too bad, I’m the only one in this house that likes them. I can’t eat that many jars of them, but I like them every now and then. I make at least one batch of them a season.

  22. Laura @ Laura Williams' Musings says:

    Pickled Green Beans are so gooood! Too bad, I’m the only one in this house that likes them. I can’t eat that many jars of them, but I like them every now and then. I make at least one batch of them a season.

  23. Jan says:

    HEre here for that recipe also!! We have had an abundance of beans this year and was told they could only be pressure canned. Which I am scared of! So I stick to the water bath method of canning and freeze all the beans. But my kids love pickle and they would love the pickled GBs also!

    Your jars look wonderful!

  24. Jan says:

    HEre here for that recipe also!! We have had an abundance of beans this year and was told they could only be pressure canned. Which I am scared of! So I stick to the water bath method of canning and freeze all the beans. But my kids love pickle and they would love the pickled GBs also!

    Your jars look wonderful!

  25. JoyceAnn says:

    Yep . Tis the Season. I’ve been busy in the kitchen too.
    14 Qts of Green beans last week , 5 more qts of green beans yesterday. 18 – 1/2 pints of blackberry jelly over the last 3 weeks. Hope to make another batch of blackberry jelly later this week.

    Froze 2 dozen ears of corn last week , also froze 24 stuffed peppers. My bell peppers are beautiful this year , makes me proud. I’ve pickled 4 qts of banana peppers and 5 pints of mixed peppers.

    My tomatoes aren’t coming in yet , hopefully they’ll start coming in next week , ready to make some salsa.

    Today I have a few more jars of green beans to can and will freeze more corn. I also need to tie up some onions and store them.

    Potatoes are dug , lying out to dry a bit , will put them in our storage area today. We’ve got more potatoes & onions that need to be dug.

    My garlic is about dryed , need to clean and store it.

    So much to do this time of the year , but I enjoy most of it.

    ~ Green Blessings ~
    JoyceAnn

  26. JoyceAnn says:

    Yep . Tis the Season. I’ve been busy in the kitchen too.
    14 Qts of Green beans last week , 5 more qts of green beans yesterday. 18 – 1/2 pints of blackberry jelly over the last 3 weeks. Hope to make another batch of blackberry jelly later this week.

    Froze 2 dozen ears of corn last week , also froze 24 stuffed peppers. My bell peppers are beautiful this year , makes me proud. I’ve pickled 4 qts of banana peppers and 5 pints of mixed peppers.

    My tomatoes aren’t coming in yet , hopefully they’ll start coming in next week , ready to make some salsa.

    Today I have a few more jars of green beans to can and will freeze more corn. I also need to tie up some onions and store them.

    Potatoes are dug , lying out to dry a bit , will put them in our storage area today. We’ve got more potatoes & onions that need to be dug.

    My garlic is about dryed , need to clean and store it.

    So much to do this time of the year , but I enjoy most of it.

    ~ Green Blessings ~
    JoyceAnn

  27. Joanne Poyourow says:

    Here on the other side of Los Angeles, I’ve been solar drying peaches. I’ve been experimenting with what works. In the electric powered dryer they often took 2-3 days with the fan and heater running full time. I wanted to find a “power down” alternative.

    In some photos from other countries, I’ve seen peaches drying on rooftops in the fresh air. But here the air is too moist at this time of year to dry fruit out in plain sunshine, the peaches rotted before they dried. Clearly they needed heat.

    I tried putting them on black pans in the solar oven but they baked instead of dried. Last year I tried putting them on stainless cookie racks in the solar oven, using the reflector but leaving off the glass top. That worked fairly well but it was quite cumbersome. I had to tie it to a chair so that the breeze wouldn’t take the whole thing over, plus the whole device had to be brought in each evening to protect from moisture.

    This year I tried putting the cookie sheets on top of black pans simply laid out on a table in the sunshine. I topped the cookie sheets with inverted perforated black plastic trays that belonged to my “food pantrie dryer” (I see that Path To freedom is now selling these dryers). Simplicity works! Those black plastic trays were the key – just enough warmth, while still allowing ventilation. It’s quite easy to collect a pile of trays each evening, and the trays require zero supervision during the day.

    Now I’m stocking up on sun-dried peaches, but had to tell my children they can’t eat up all the dried ones while the fresh are still on the tree!

  28. Joanne Poyourow says:

    Here on the other side of Los Angeles, I’ve been solar drying peaches. I’ve been experimenting with what works. In the electric powered dryer they often took 2-3 days with the fan and heater running full time. I wanted to find a “power down” alternative.

    In some photos from other countries, I’ve seen peaches drying on rooftops in the fresh air. But here the air is too moist at this time of year to dry fruit out in plain sunshine, the peaches rotted before they dried. Clearly they needed heat.

    I tried putting them on black pans in the solar oven but they baked instead of dried. Last year I tried putting them on stainless cookie racks in the solar oven, using the reflector but leaving off the glass top. That worked fairly well but it was quite cumbersome. I had to tie it to a chair so that the breeze wouldn’t take the whole thing over, plus the whole device had to be brought in each evening to protect from moisture.

    This year I tried putting the cookie sheets on top of black pans simply laid out on a table in the sunshine. I topped the cookie sheets with inverted perforated black plastic trays that belonged to my “food pantrie dryer” (I see that Path To freedom is now selling these dryers). Simplicity works! Those black plastic trays were the key – just enough warmth, while still allowing ventilation. It’s quite easy to collect a pile of trays each evening, and the trays require zero supervision during the day.

    Now I’m stocking up on sun-dried peaches, but had to tell my children they can’t eat up all the dried ones while the fresh are still on the tree!

  29. Kathie says:

    Oh so very lovely! Better than money in the bank.

  30. Kathie says:

    Oh so very lovely! Better than money in the bank.

  31. Devin Quince says:

    We have put up 6 jars of strawberry preserve, 6lbs of peas, 3 lbs of kale, chard, and mustard greens. We have also frozen 5 lbs of local strawberries from our garden and the farmers market along with 2 lbs of rasberrys

  32. Devin Quince says:

    We have put up 6 jars of strawberry preserve, 6lbs of peas, 3 lbs of kale, chard, and mustard greens. We have also frozen 5 lbs of local strawberries from our garden and the farmers market along with 2 lbs of rasberrys

  33. Janice K says:

    We’ve been pickling our Bok Choi as Kimchee style, Pickled Radishes, Pickled Perilla (shiso)leaves with Ume Vinegar, trying to dry some herbs, dried some persimmon leaves (for tea and medicines) Will be pickling some cukes soon. We do have a good harvest of peppers so we may pickle some of them. We have an over abundance of Zukes so the idea of drying them is great! I’ll try that soon. We’ll be getting a decent harvest of tomatoes so those will be dried and pasted.

  34. Janice K says:

    We’ve been pickling our Bok Choi as Kimchee style, Pickled Radishes, Pickled Perilla (shiso)leaves with Ume Vinegar, trying to dry some herbs, dried some persimmon leaves (for tea and medicines) Will be pickling some cukes soon. We do have a good harvest of peppers so we may pickle some of them. We have an over abundance of Zukes so the idea of drying them is great! I’ll try that soon. We’ll be getting a decent harvest of tomatoes so those will be dried and pasted.

  35. Sue says:

    I put up Cherry Jam 2 weeks ago, but I am afraid it did not jell. I used Rainier Cherries (from our tree) and when I rock the jar, it moves like syrup. I am a little discouraged, but now I am wondering if one can “can” a straight-up cherry jam. I followed the instructions to the tee. I even consulted 3 different books, including the ball blue book. I have heard that combining with other fruit with a higher pectin might work. What do you think, Anais?

  36. Sue says:

    I put up Cherry Jam 2 weeks ago, but I am afraid it did not jell. I used Rainier Cherries (from our tree) and when I rock the jar, it moves like syrup. I am a little discouraged, but now I am wondering if one can “can” a straight-up cherry jam. I followed the instructions to the tee. I even consulted 3 different books, including the ball blue book. I have heard that combining with other fruit with a higher pectin might work. What do you think, Anais?

  37. craig junkins says:

    Hey everybody!!,
    Great posts!!
    I preserve mostly with dehydrater and freezing. Not a great garden this year..low production. But, I have dried a lot of green beans, onions, some wild black raspberries, peppers, summer squash, strawberries, and herbs.
    Froze wild black raspberries, green beans, peas, and blueberries.
    Tomatoes on the way.
    If anyone wants to look into dehydrating I HIGHLY recomend a book that my sister gave me for Christmas..Mary Bell’s complete dehydrator cookbook. It’s really fantastic.
    Keep up the good work!
    IndianaCraig

  38. craig junkins says:

    Hey everybody!!,
    Great posts!!
    I preserve mostly with dehydrater and freezing. Not a great garden this year..low production. But, I have dried a lot of green beans, onions, some wild black raspberries, peppers, summer squash, strawberries, and herbs.
    Froze wild black raspberries, green beans, peas, and blueberries.
    Tomatoes on the way.
    If anyone wants to look into dehydrating I HIGHLY recomend a book that my sister gave me for Christmas..Mary Bell’s complete dehydrator cookbook. It’s really fantastic.
    Keep up the good work!
    IndianaCraig

  39. Wendy says:

    Wow! Your “day’s worth of work” is impressive.

    This weekend, I canned four (more) pints of strawberry jam (organic PYO) and two quarts of cucumber (homegrown) pickles. I also have lots of frozen peas (some homegrown and some from the Farmer’s Market) and strawberries (PYO). Today, we foraged several pints of wild, Maine blueberries and those are in the freezer.

    My herbs are all ready for the dehydrator, and I should be doing that this weekend, along with the zuchinni my friend gave me.

    Pickled beans … hmm? I should try those. I like green beans, fresh or frozen, but no one else in my family does … but everyone digs pickles … hmm? ;).

  40. Wendy says:

    Wow! Your “day’s worth of work” is impressive.

    This weekend, I canned four (more) pints of strawberry jam (organic PYO) and two quarts of cucumber (homegrown) pickles. I also have lots of frozen peas (some homegrown and some from the Farmer’s Market) and strawberries (PYO). Today, we foraged several pints of wild, Maine blueberries and those are in the freezer.

    My herbs are all ready for the dehydrator, and I should be doing that this weekend, along with the zuchinni my friend gave me.

    Pickled beans … hmm? I should try those. I like green beans, fresh or frozen, but no one else in my family does … but everyone digs pickles … hmm? ;).

  41. Roger, Gone Green says:

    If you really do have a lot of apples, may I recommend cider? We have a dual tub apple press here, just a mile or two from you. A couple of bushels of apples dragged over on the bike would net you three to five gallons of fresh mill cider. (If you soak the pomace in water and/or enzymes (shudder) after pressing a second pressing of the same pomace will stretch the cider and make it more “unfiltered store strength.”)

    Not only is the mill cider amazingly delicious to drink, you can put it down like wine (with either wild or store-bought yeast) and make a great hard cider.

    We have been known to eat all our own apples and buy up to 18-20 bushels of cider-grade apples from a local orchard (Oak Glen) to drink and put down for cider.

    We are out this year, or I would offer a tasting . . . but if you make wine, you can make cider.

    Our best cider ever was an accident (we forget it in the sun in its carboy for a couple of days.) Wild yeast colonized it, and the accidental exposure to the afternoon summer sun apparently cleared it — creating a scant three gallons of the most delicious, sparkling hard cider we’ve made yet.

    To whet your appetite: http://ezgreenjournal.blogspot.com/2005/11/cider-flows-under-ol-moontree.html

  42. Roger, Gone Green says:

    If you really do have a lot of apples, may I recommend cider? We have a dual tub apple press here, just a mile or two from you. A couple of bushels of apples dragged over on the bike would net you three to five gallons of fresh mill cider. (If you soak the pomace in water and/or enzymes (shudder) after pressing a second pressing of the same pomace will stretch the cider and make it more “unfiltered store strength.”)

    Not only is the mill cider amazingly delicious to drink, you can put it down like wine (with either wild or store-bought yeast) and make a great hard cider.

    We have been known to eat all our own apples and buy up to 18-20 bushels of cider-grade apples from a local orchard (Oak Glen) to drink and put down for cider.

    We are out this year, or I would offer a tasting . . . but if you make wine, you can make cider.

    Our best cider ever was an accident (we forget it in the sun in its carboy for a couple of days.) Wild yeast colonized it, and the accidental exposure to the afternoon summer sun apparently cleared it — creating a scant three gallons of the most delicious, sparkling hard cider we’ve made yet.

    To whet your appetite: http://ezgreenjournal.blogspot.com/2005/11/cider-flows-under-ol-moontree.html

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