PAYING MORE FOR LESS

Have you noticed this slight of packaging, incredible shrinking phenomenon?

How are you dealing with increase in food prices?   How are you fighting back by letting retailers know that “we don’t need no stinkin’ packages!”

Here are our ‘Seven Keys’ to saving money.  Care to add?

Grow your own
Buy local and in season
Look for bulk goods and staples
Cook and bake from scratch using basic ingredients
Preserve – can, dry, freeze and store
Build community – start a food cooperative, get your neighbors involved,  barter and swap goods or services
Do more with less – save, stretch or do without

I stumbled across this article via Frugal Domesticity, she also noted a helpful website (www.mouseprint.com) which exposes the fine print on many name brands.

The incredible shrinking cereal box (CNN Money)

The packaging may look the same but the amount inside has gone down, that’s how companies try to pass on food inflation. But consumers are wising up.

As manufacturers cope with the rising cost of raw ingredients and fuel, downsizing their package sizes is one increasingly popular way to pass along a price increase without drawing too much attention.

“They’re raising the prices a little, and shrinking the boxes a little,” said Marcia Mogelonsky, consumer analyst with Mintel International, a consumer research firm in Chicago. “If you’re running through the supermarket, you don’t necessarily notice that your cereal box is an ounce or two smaller. That’s how they’re controlling the prices.”

Read full article

Comments(18)

  1. GarlicMan76458 says:

    The 8th way to save money is to

    Trade produce/goods with your local community.

    You may edit this as you wish.

    GarlicMan76458 on http://www.FreedomGardens.org

  2. GarlicMan76458 says:

    The 8th way to save money is to

    Trade produce/goods with your local community.

    You may edit this as you wish.

    GarlicMan76458 on http://www.FreedomGardens.org

  3. Andrea says:

    Then the 9th way to save is to …use your leftovers! It doesn’t matter what a great deal you got if you throw half of it away. That’s been one of our hardest lessons, having grown up in a throwaway economy. But we’re learning, and slowly but surely our food budget is reflecting that fact.

    And I suppose the 10th way to save money on your food budget is to leave your children at home LOL. There’s so much garbage out there marketed specifically to little ones that it’s almost impossible to get out of the store without a kicking, screaming fit. They don’t understand that the veggies in the plain can are the same as the veggies in the Dora the Explorer can. And the advertising geniuses know that….argh.

  4. Andrea says:

    Then the 9th way to save is to …use your leftovers! It doesn’t matter what a great deal you got if you throw half of it away. That’s been one of our hardest lessons, having grown up in a throwaway economy. But we’re learning, and slowly but surely our food budget is reflecting that fact.

    And I suppose the 10th way to save money on your food budget is to leave your children at home LOL. There’s so much garbage out there marketed specifically to little ones that it’s almost impossible to get out of the store without a kicking, screaming fit. They don’t understand that the veggies in the plain can are the same as the veggies in the Dora the Explorer can. And the advertising geniuses know that….argh.

  5. Andrea says:

    PS….not that I use store bought canned veggies….yuck… just an example : )

  6. Andrea says:

    PS….not that I use store bought canned veggies….yuck… just an example : )

  7. 1916home.net says:

    This is one reason why I read survivalblog.com also. These food prices going up is scary and storing your own food is the only way to curb the price increases.

    G.M.O. created foods, like from Monsanto, are slowly going to take over. They’ll become the seed giants.. the seed kings if you will. In a few generations, Monsantos GMO seeds will be everywhere. In Mexico, China, India, Peru… the poorest of nations, not just America. And when their seeds no longer row into crops, because poor people cant afford Monsanto’s “Round Up!” weed killer and Monsanto’s bug spray… the world will become like modern day serfs.

  8. 1916home.net says:

    This is one reason why I read survivalblog.com also. These food prices going up is scary and storing your own food is the only way to curb the price increases.

    G.M.O. created foods, like from Monsanto, are slowly going to take over. They’ll become the seed giants.. the seed kings if you will. In a few generations, Monsantos GMO seeds will be everywhere. In Mexico, China, India, Peru… the poorest of nations, not just America. And when their seeds no longer row into crops, because poor people cant afford Monsanto’s “Round Up!” weed killer and Monsanto’s bug spray… the world will become like modern day serfs.

  9. Susy says:

    I do all of these and I agree with Andrea on not throwing food away. I even use my pear & apple peels to make food for my dog, we don’t waste a thing in this household. I’m huge fan of “doing without”, which applies in all aspects of life.

    I started implementing most of these changes this year and I’m saving $100 a month on groceries (and I was already baking everything from scratch). So while others are complaining about the price of food, I’m saving money. An additional plus is not having to step foot in a grocery store. I did that for the first time in a long time last week and I must say, I don’t miss it at all. Give me the open air of the farmer’s market and being able to chat with the people that grow the food anyday!

  10. Susy says:

    I do all of these and I agree with Andrea on not throwing food away. I even use my pear & apple peels to make food for my dog, we don’t waste a thing in this household. I’m huge fan of “doing without”, which applies in all aspects of life.

    I started implementing most of these changes this year and I’m saving $100 a month on groceries (and I was already baking everything from scratch). So while others are complaining about the price of food, I’m saving money. An additional plus is not having to step foot in a grocery store. I did that for the first time in a long time last week and I must say, I don’t miss it at all. Give me the open air of the farmer’s market and being able to chat with the people that grow the food anyday!

  11. Alec says:

    Great list! To add a comment about not wasting food; it always kills me when I see how much food people throw away and waste. We never throw away food unless it has spoiled and then it goes into making new dirt 🙂 Even very small amounts of left over food are worth keeping. A small amount of left overs from a few dinners makes a great lunch!

  12. Alec says:

    Great list! To add a comment about not wasting food; it always kills me when I see how much food people throw away and waste. We never throw away food unless it has spoiled and then it goes into making new dirt 🙂 Even very small amounts of left over food are worth keeping. A small amount of left overs from a few dinners makes a great lunch!

  13. Kathy says:

    I have been amazed at the savings in time and dollars that my husband and I have achieved in just a few months. Your website has been a great help and reading the journal and the input from your readers has encouraged me along my new found path.

    We’ve started a compost bin and “adopted” a small flock of chickens. So far we are only getting about a dozen eggs a week, but that is more than enough for the two of us. Our food scraps are either going to the chickens or in the compost bin. We are continuing to recycle plastic, paper, aluminum cans, glass and coardboard packaging, which has reduced our trips to the dump down to once a month or less. I also noticed that a neighbor had a beautiful pear tree just loaded down with fruit. I approached him about the possibility of picking some and he was pleased to have someone interested as it was all going to waste. I picked 4 large bags and he inivited me to come back and get more. Some have been shreaded and frozen for pies, etc. and some have been the object of my first venture into canning. Some have been wrapped in newspaper and placed in the back of my pantry to ripen for fall eating at the advice of my 76 year old Mother-In-Law. Still others are awaiting their fate.

    We are in the beginning phases of starting a “square-foot” garden; expanding from our current 2 tomato plants that have been less than productive than I’d hoped, due to the WEIRD weather this year. I have been reading and learning about organic gardening, canning, re-purposing and any thing else that I can to help us in our efforts in becoming self-sufficient and less reliant on retail. It is so much fun to share our experiences with friends, family, neighbors and co-workers. Thank you, thank you, thank you for opening my eyes and guiding me on this path!

  14. Kathy says:

    I have been amazed at the savings in time and dollars that my husband and I have achieved in just a few months. Your website has been a great help and reading the journal and the input from your readers has encouraged me along my new found path.

    We’ve started a compost bin and “adopted” a small flock of chickens. So far we are only getting about a dozen eggs a week, but that is more than enough for the two of us. Our food scraps are either going to the chickens or in the compost bin. We are continuing to recycle plastic, paper, aluminum cans, glass and coardboard packaging, which has reduced our trips to the dump down to once a month or less. I also noticed that a neighbor had a beautiful pear tree just loaded down with fruit. I approached him about the possibility of picking some and he was pleased to have someone interested as it was all going to waste. I picked 4 large bags and he inivited me to come back and get more. Some have been shreaded and frozen for pies, etc. and some have been the object of my first venture into canning. Some have been wrapped in newspaper and placed in the back of my pantry to ripen for fall eating at the advice of my 76 year old Mother-In-Law. Still others are awaiting their fate.

    We are in the beginning phases of starting a “square-foot” garden; expanding from our current 2 tomato plants that have been less than productive than I’d hoped, due to the WEIRD weather this year. I have been reading and learning about organic gardening, canning, re-purposing and any thing else that I can to help us in our efforts in becoming self-sufficient and less reliant on retail. It is so much fun to share our experiences with friends, family, neighbors and co-workers. Thank you, thank you, thank you for opening my eyes and guiding me on this path!

  15. Patrice Farmer says:

    This is great tips. I need to do much more because we often buy prepackaged foods and buy the dollar fast foods which has all that packaging that goes into the landfill. Thanks for the tips, all of them.

  16. Patrice Farmer says:

    This is great tips. I need to do much more because we often buy prepackaged foods and buy the dollar fast foods which has all that packaging that goes into the landfill. Thanks for the tips, all of them.

  17. J.D. Collins says:

    My first entry into sustainable living occurred this past June during the “tomato contamination scare.” My family was very disappointed and scared to buy tomatos, so I planted six Big Boy plants.

    Talk about the gift that keeps on giving? We still have about three dozen beautiful pieces of organic fruit and more on the vine! The cost was minimal, very minimal. We saved big bucks.

    The result – happy family!

  18. J.D. Collins says:

    My first entry into sustainable living occurred this past June during the “tomato contamination scare.” My family was very disappointed and scared to buy tomatos, so I planted six Big Boy plants.

    Talk about the gift that keeps on giving? We still have about three dozen beautiful pieces of organic fruit and more on the vine! The cost was minimal, very minimal. We saved big bucks.

    The result – happy family!

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