PATH TO LIVING A SUSTAINBLE LIFE IN THE CITY

Sustainable Sundays @ the Natural History Museum

Different Shades of Green

When: Sunday, November 9 (10:00 am – 4:00 pm)
Where: Natural History Museum, 900 Exposition Blvd, Los Angeles
Cost: Tickets are $9.00 for adults and $2.00 for children (5-12) and can be purchased at the door.

In this new series, the Museum becomes a forum in which visitors learn about international conservation issues, and then can interact with organizations that actually do something about those issues.

Bikes, slow food, farmers market and urban homesteading advocates. Path to Freedom, give a presentation on urban sustainability called ‘The Path to Sustainable Living in the City’ (60 minute) by Jules Dervaes

At 11:00am In a 60 minute Jules Dervaes will talk about his family’s revoluntionary urban homestead project in Pasadena and their journey toward a sustainable and self-sufficient life in the city. The Dervaes family is living a protest against the corporate powers that control the food supply by growing 6,000 pounds of produce a year on 1/5 of an acre.  Over the last twenty years the family also has instigated numerous sustainable elements into their lifestyle, from edible landscaping, solar panels, biodiesel, citified farm animals, greywater practices and many more.

At 12:30pm, “eco-chef” Aaron French will present “Eating Greener: The Ecology of Food and Why It Matters,” a 40-minute lecture, 20-minute cooking demonstration, and a 15-minute Q&A session. It will offer participants an integrated framework for our food systems and provide context for current buzzwords such as “local,” “organic,” and “sustainable.” Participants will learn steps each person can take to foster and promote sustainability in their local food region. Chef French holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Ecology, is the chef of The Sunnyside Cafe in Albany, California, writes the EcoChef column found in ten Bay Area New Group newspapers, and was a participant in Slow Food Nation, both as a contributor to the Slow Food Nation blog and as host of a Slow Breakfast at The Sunnyside Cafe.

Conservation International’s Jen Morris will also present information about investing in global pro-conservation, small- and medium-sized businesses at 2:30pm.

View site for event details

——————-About Path to Freedom——————

Jules Dervaes is the founder of Path to Freedom, a family-operated, viable urban homestead project established in 2001 to promote a simpler and more fulfilling lifestyle and to sow a “homegrown revolution ™” against the corporate powers that control the food supply.

Since the mid-1980s, Mr. Dervaes and his three adult children, Anaïs, Justin, and Jordanne, have steadily worked at transforming their ordinary city lot in Pasadena, California, into a thriving organic garden that supplies them with food all year round. The family also runs a successful business providing fresh produce to local high-end restaurants and caterers.

Through their adventures in growing and preserving their own food, installing a solar power system, home-brewing biodiesel for fuel, raising backyard farm animals, and learning back-to-basics skills, these modern-day pioneers have revived the old-fashioned spirit of self-reliance and resourcefulness. 

In 2001, the family began an impromptu journal on their website Path to Freedom.com–the first, largest, and most comprehensive urban homestead site. By documenting and freely sharing the steps they have taken towards a self-sufficient life, the Dervaeses have inspired hundreds of thousands of readers to pursue a sustainable future and have generated a 21st century urban homestead movement.

Mr. Dervaes has long been concerned with the state of the world and its environment, coming of age during the turmoil of the late 1960s. Anxious for the future of his family, he moved to New Zealand in 1973, where he homesteaded in an abandoned gold mining town and became a beekeeper. After returning to the U.S., he lived on 10 acres in central Florida where he continued homesteading, later moving across the country to one-fifth of an acre in Pasadena.

A period of drought in Southern California the early 1990s prompted Mr. Dervaes to remove his lawn and replace it with wildflowers and herbs, and, later, edible landscaping. In the Fall of 2000, angered upon hearing about the introduction of GMOs into the food supply by U.S. biotech corporations, Mr. Dervaes decided to take matters into his own hands by growing as much of his family’s food as possible. The urban homestead’s one-tenth acre garden now can produce over 6,000 pounds of fruit and vegetables annually.

Mr. Dervaes and his family have been the subject of numerous articles in newspapers around the world, including The New York Times Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, and FAZ (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung), and was recently featured on ABC’s Nightline and CNN.

Comments(6)

  1. gerry medland says:

    Way to go!
    the best example of leadership is ‘to lead from the front’ IMHO,PTF in its entire content is an outstanding if not ‘unique’ portfolio of incredible encouragement and inspiration to us all.I am continually inspired by your presentation and devotion to bringing us so much positive and vibrant applicable information on a daily basis!THANK YOU ALL for your hard work!
    People arestaring to ‘wake up’!
    blessings
    gerry m

  2. gerry medland says:

    Way to go!
    the best example of leadership is ‘to lead from the front’ IMHO,PTF in its entire content is an outstanding if not ‘unique’ portfolio of incredible encouragement and inspiration to us all.I am continually inspired by your presentation and devotion to bringing us so much positive and vibrant applicable information on a daily basis!THANK YOU ALL for your hard work!
    People arestaring to ‘wake up’!
    blessings
    gerry m

  3. Tara says:

    Hey, Sustainable Sundays is the name of my blog! 😀

  4. Tara says:

    Hey, Sustainable Sundays is the name of my blog! 😀

  5. NEW BEGINNINGS | Little Homestead in the City says:

    […] around So Cal— Sustainable LA, All Saints Church, Ten Thousand Villages, Smith & Hawken, National History Museum on urban homesteading and a couple at UCLA on food […]

  6. NEW BEGINNINGS | Little Homestead in the City says:

    […] around So Cal— Sustainable LA, All Saints Church, Ten Thousand Villages, Smith & Hawken, National History Museum on urban homesteading and a couple at UCLA on food […]

Post a comment