ON THE HOMEFRONT

A day is done, the sun sets on the Little Homestead in the City

When folks ask me about urban homesteading, I tell them is not only a way of life, it’s a 24-7 job.  A you really have to be committed because there’s no turning back once you take the plunge.    Even on bad days when you are dealing with failures, battling bugs, sick animals, wacky weather, incomplete projects you have to go forward.  Why?  Because the next day and the next you have to do it all over again.  For the rest of your life if you so choose.  Urban homesteading is not a “one and done” (one year wonder) it’s a journey of a lifetime.  A journey that’s filled with both hills and valleys.

That’s what’s so practical and “uncomplicated” about (urban) homesteading. A pioneer spirit resides in each of us and every morning you answer “the call.”    No matter if the world around you is falling apart  – your world is where you are.    Sure there are struggle and failures – but that’s what makes you a better more knowledge urban homesteader going through life “back to basics” school of hard knocks.  So while headlines tell of doom and gloom, what keeps us going here on the ‘stead – bare dirt, hungry animals,  bountiful harvest, new projects, people – life.

The benefits of urban homesteading are endless – not only are you creating and implementing positive change you are growing more independent and knowledgeable by hands on experiences.

So reader’s what keeps you going (besides coffee) 😉

Behind

I’ve been a bad blogger.  Now that I’ve been honest and admitted to the fact ( got that burden off my shoulders) I can move past the denial.   Truth is I’ve been so busy, I’ve not been good at responding to ya’lls comments.  Not to mention there’s been several dozen requests for more! More info, more tips, more this, more that etc, etc.  I know, I know…

More “happening” posts still to come.

Comments(20)

  1. Britta says:

    Thank you for all of your posts. I never comment (in the past year or two, maybe twice). I just love soaking up the beauty of your place, and I know that it is hard work. Thank you for doing that, and communicating with us through your photos and stories, which I’m sure adds to your work even more. I’m so glad you enjoy doing it and again, thank you.

  2. Britta says:

    Thank you for all of your posts. I never comment (in the past year or two, maybe twice). I just love soaking up the beauty of your place, and I know that it is hard work. Thank you for doing that, and communicating with us through your photos and stories, which I’m sure adds to your work even more. I’m so glad you enjoy doing it and again, thank you.

  3. Beth says:

    This is so true. Our homestead is still very modest and we still have so much to do. No animals other than 2 dogs and 2 cats yet…but already with our garden and our new lifestyle, I am finding that there is always things that need to be done. Preserving, baking bread…tending the garden…..the list grows with each new day. Yet so does peace. Peace grows each new day. My husband commented how comforting it is to come home and find many jars of canned food and the smell of fresh baked bread or some other goodie I’ve made. Life is so good.

  4. Beth says:

    This is so true. Our homestead is still very modest and we still have so much to do. No animals other than 2 dogs and 2 cats yet…but already with our garden and our new lifestyle, I am finding that there is always things that need to be done. Preserving, baking bread…tending the garden…..the list grows with each new day. Yet so does peace. Peace grows each new day. My husband commented how comforting it is to come home and find many jars of canned food and the smell of fresh baked bread or some other goodie I’ve made. Life is so good.

  5. ~~Melissa says:

    I see and admire your dedication and commitment, and recognize that some days or weeks or more must be quite demanding. I hope you receive even a portion of the inspiration you send out.

    Here’s what keeps this non-coffee drinker going:

    -when I started my garden just a few years ago, in a young urban subdivision, there were few birds or beasts or butterflies. It was barren, former farm land with no trees and an empty feeling.

    -today, I can pick and eat lunch in my garden and I have enough plantings that my garden in particular attracts flocks of migrating birds, and hosts dozens of varieties year round. Squirrels, chipmunks (chippunks), hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, skunks, rabbits, moles…: the whole gang is here.

    -Sometimes I think back to how easy it was before: no garden, no maintenance, but none of the WOW of nature. The intrigue of it all, right down to the microscopic level, keeps me going. And the endless mouthfuls of ultra sweet raspberries in late July.

    🙂

  6. ~~Melissa says:

    I see and admire your dedication and commitment, and recognize that some days or weeks or more must be quite demanding. I hope you receive even a portion of the inspiration you send out.

    Here’s what keeps this non-coffee drinker going:

    -when I started my garden just a few years ago, in a young urban subdivision, there were few birds or beasts or butterflies. It was barren, former farm land with no trees and an empty feeling.

    -today, I can pick and eat lunch in my garden and I have enough plantings that my garden in particular attracts flocks of migrating birds, and hosts dozens of varieties year round. Squirrels, chipmunks (chippunks), hummingbirds, butterflies, bees, skunks, rabbits, moles…: the whole gang is here.

    -Sometimes I think back to how easy it was before: no garden, no maintenance, but none of the WOW of nature. The intrigue of it all, right down to the microscopic level, keeps me going. And the endless mouthfuls of ultra sweet raspberries in late July.

    🙂

  7. Judith says:

    Anais, I check your website daily and never fail to get a sense of hope and encouragement from your postings. If there’s nothing posted, I move on to other sites I’ve accumulated.
    One site is from Sunset magazine. (Sunset.com). There are two blogs in particular of interest. One is called “Fresh Dirt” and the other “One Block Diet”. They both relate to what you are posting, and the latest posting on the One Block Diet has a free download-able post to raising chickens. Although Sunset is a Western states based magazine, I thought your readers might find this link of interest.
    Thank you for all your hard work.
    Judy from Anaheim

  8. Judith says:

    Anais, I check your website daily and never fail to get a sense of hope and encouragement from your postings. If there’s nothing posted, I move on to other sites I’ve accumulated.
    One site is from Sunset magazine. (Sunset.com). There are two blogs in particular of interest. One is called “Fresh Dirt” and the other “One Block Diet”. They both relate to what you are posting, and the latest posting on the One Block Diet has a free download-able post to raising chickens. Although Sunset is a Western states based magazine, I thought your readers might find this link of interest.
    Thank you for all your hard work.
    Judy from Anaheim

  9. Janice K says:

    Lately I’ve realized we have so many more birds that come to our garden! Pretty yellow ones, robins, lots of Mocking birds (eating my blackberries!) But I love it all. We did have a family of skunks, and I saw a mouse (which I’m wondering what to do about it) There’s always work to be done, and since I still work at a 9~6 job, dividing my time is hard.

    Anais, please don’t worry about us, we just love that you share your pictures. Yes, we do have lots of questions, and we have an endless hunger for more homesteading knowledge from our “elder” pioneers but to just see your garden, animals and the happenings in your daily life is enriching to us enough to keep going everyday.

    Thank you for your inspiration!

  10. Janice K says:

    Lately I’ve realized we have so many more birds that come to our garden! Pretty yellow ones, robins, lots of Mocking birds (eating my blackberries!) But I love it all. We did have a family of skunks, and I saw a mouse (which I’m wondering what to do about it) There’s always work to be done, and since I still work at a 9~6 job, dividing my time is hard.

    Anais, please don’t worry about us, we just love that you share your pictures. Yes, we do have lots of questions, and we have an endless hunger for more homesteading knowledge from our “elder” pioneers but to just see your garden, animals and the happenings in your daily life is enriching to us enough to keep going everyday.

    Thank you for your inspiration!

  11. Di says:

    I think Beth said it right when she said it’s a “lifestyle”. Its not about doing things the quick way, it’s about doing things so they are healthier, less environmentally impactful, and usually cheaper.
    What keeps me going? Feeling good. Harvesting something I grew in my own garden, especially from seed (come on tomatoes ripen!!!), seeing new growth.

    Its a lifestyle, a journey and an enlightenment.

  12. Di says:

    I think Beth said it right when she said it’s a “lifestyle”. Its not about doing things the quick way, it’s about doing things so they are healthier, less environmentally impactful, and usually cheaper.
    What keeps me going? Feeling good. Harvesting something I grew in my own garden, especially from seed (come on tomatoes ripen!!!), seeing new growth.

    Its a lifestyle, a journey and an enlightenment.

  13. Anais says:

    Britta, Beth, Melissa, Judith, Janice K, Di

    Thank you for your encouraging comments and your insights into what makes your world turn (thanks for the dialouge – always great to hear feedback from our readers)

    We are certainly blessed to be able to share our journey with so many wonderful folks.

    Here’s to a simple and fulfilling life!

  14. Anais says:

    Britta, Beth, Melissa, Judith, Janice K, Di

    Thank you for your encouraging comments and your insights into what makes your world turn (thanks for the dialouge – always great to hear feedback from our readers)

    We are certainly blessed to be able to share our journey with so many wonderful folks.

    Here’s to a simple and fulfilling life!

  15. Jan says:

    What keeps me going? ITs my duty as a mom to prepare the very best food for my children. And gardening is the only way to do it. I have had a garden every since my kids were born, I couldnt imagine living without one. Also I pray alot when I am gardening about everything, I talk and talk its great way to get everything off your chest!

    The rabbits, deer, small insects, and other critters wouldnt know what to do either!

  16. Jan says:

    What keeps me going? ITs my duty as a mom to prepare the very best food for my children. And gardening is the only way to do it. I have had a garden every since my kids were born, I couldnt imagine living without one. Also I pray alot when I am gardening about everything, I talk and talk its great way to get everything off your chest!

    The rabbits, deer, small insects, and other critters wouldnt know what to do either!

  17. Lisa Z says:

    Thank you so much for all the work you do! Your website and journal are amazing and incredibly inspiring. I spend a couple of hours a day on the internet and often I feel that’s too much. However, I would not even know about urban homesteading much less be doing it if it weren’t for sites like yours and Sharon Astyk’s blog, No Impact Man, Crunchy Chicken, the Riot for Austerity, etc. It is amazing what I’ve learned, and I’m so grateful for it. It’s a Revolution!

    Besides that, the fact that we’re eating healthier and cheaper than ever is a necessity in our lives. That really keeps me baking the bread, canning the jam and sauces, freezing and drying, etc. I know it’s best for my husband, kids and me.

  18. Lisa Z says:

    Thank you so much for all the work you do! Your website and journal are amazing and incredibly inspiring. I spend a couple of hours a day on the internet and often I feel that’s too much. However, I would not even know about urban homesteading much less be doing it if it weren’t for sites like yours and Sharon Astyk’s blog, No Impact Man, Crunchy Chicken, the Riot for Austerity, etc. It is amazing what I’ve learned, and I’m so grateful for it. It’s a Revolution!

    Besides that, the fact that we’re eating healthier and cheaper than ever is a necessity in our lives. That really keeps me baking the bread, canning the jam and sauces, freezing and drying, etc. I know it’s best for my husband, kids and me.

  19. Anais says:

    Hello Liz

    You are welcome. It’s certainly been a long journey. When we started documenting our journey online back in 2001 PTF was the only urban homesteding site out there – very lonely existence that was.

    Now, thanks in part to sites like PTF, the movement is gaining momentum and growing in popularity, and it’s great to finally see bloggers and fellow travelers who are on the same path.

    Glad to hear of your success in traveling a more sustainable path.

  20. Anais says:

    Hello Liz

    You are welcome. It’s certainly been a long journey. When we started documenting our journey online back in 2001 PTF was the only urban homesteding site out there – very lonely existence that was.

    Now, thanks in part to sites like PTF, the movement is gaining momentum and growing in popularity, and it’s great to finally see bloggers and fellow travelers who are on the same path.

    Glad to hear of your success in traveling a more sustainable path.

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