MARCH AGAINST MONSANTO

 

I can see the day coming when even your home garden is gonna be against the law. — Union Sundown – Bob Dylan

Millions of concerned citizens took to the streets this weekend demanding their “right to know about gmos.”  Every day there is mounting evidence that genetically engineered food might not save the planet nor its people.

Over a decade ago, a similar protest had us ready to grab our trowels and grow even more food to feed our family.  That year was 2001. At that time, there was also a similar march against GMO foods in San Diego.  My father back then had become really upset by the GMO issue and, having been in college during the sixties, he was all too familiar with marches and protests.  He was always concerned about social issues and social change  but he was not one to carry a sign and march.  Rather, he always tried to do something with his life that would be a “living protest,”  making his life a “sign” everyone could see and read. So, in 2001, rather than march,  he decided to make a more determined stand with his life (his “Alamo”).  That year  our harvest weigh in was over 2000 lbs and that was not only shocking but also encouraging.  It proved that one could grow a reasonable amount of food on a typical city lot (1/10th garden plot).  This was the way to fight and really prove a point.

I found this interesting article which somewhat reflect our attitude regarding the March against Monsanto.

[…] It’s not enough to simply tell people to eat organic, or vote for initiatives that will label GMOs. The very first thing you can do is plant your own garden. If you have the space, plant a garden larger than what you need to feed your family and help someone that is less fortunate with some fresh homegrown food from your garden. What if you don’t have a yard to plant in? One option is growing indoors. […]

A dozen years later, our small city lot is still productive and a growing (every day) protest,  yeilding over 6000 lbs. a year, giving us not only (most) of all our produce but also an income to boot.

If you haven’t already seen our little (award winning) “homemade” film (Homegrown Revolution), now is as good time as any to see it again. Our goal is to inspire others to GROW THEIR OWN.  To us, this is the best way to take a stand against Monsanto.

Can you dig it?

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7IbODJiEM5A]

 

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Comments(5)

  1. Bill S. says:

    I’m with your dad as I’m not one to carry a sign and call it a day. Growing your own food, and even more subversively, cultivating your own seed is a far more effective protest. Did you see where in Europe there’s a movement afoot to register and only allow certain strains of seeds to be sold? If the plant strain you want to grow isn’t on the ‘approved’ list, you can’t buy it. The plan is, thank goodness, only in it’s infancy, but it shows how desperately the elites of this world want to control the food source.

    BTW, I’m new to your site with a home and lot that is pretty much the same size as yours. I’m in northern Nevada, so it’s a much different climate but we can still grow a lot of stuff around here and your blog has given me lots of new ideas to try out!

    • robin gangopadhya says:

      Oh how I am dying to get my whole place into one self-sufficient food growing place. Reasons are all well said by Jules and the writer above. I have failed for years. Nothing grows on this “land”, most seeds are GMOs so you have to follow a chemical path which I would not.
      I follow what Vandana Shiva is doing all over the world. A lot of things have led me to create a formal “definition” of “food”.
      Food one eats must have the following characteristics
      (1)must rot in a given time depending upon its natural cycle. If it ain’t, it is not your “food”.
      (2)must have been attractive to all forms of insects & birds. If an insect found itself repelled by any plant part or a bird could not sense the natural scent of fruit/flower, it ain’t your food.
      (3)You must be able to “produce” whatever your consume as food in a manner entirely decided by you. If you do not have the right, then it ain’t your food.
      (4)Plants of any kind must have the ability to be propagated by you in any manner you want. If it cann’t, it ain’t your food
      (5)Your friends & family or whosoever, must have to right to get seeds or any part of a part for the sole purpose of reproduction and propagation wherever they want. If they cann’t, it ain’t your food
      I have another side of it. We MAKE the laws. So WE sit down & decide which LAWS WE pass that relate to our food. All citizens must make the following phenomenon as “law “ & be integral part of the “inalienable right” : that is to prevent unwanted contamination of their plant and other food sources from any form of chemical – organic or inorganic in nature ARISING OUT OF USE OF GMOs. A part of this laws allows YOU to sue for damages the source and the owner of such GMOs.
      If the purposes of the 5 food-characteristics and the anti-contamination law are not self-evident, let me add a few more bones & flesh to them.
      (1) Reflects the fact that all “natural” foods have a precise “rotting cycle”. This rule excludes designer foods that do no good to your ecology. Seen the tasteless-non rotting monster “strawberries”? Is that food?
      (2) Allows you to be aware that food comes from an ecology which provides self-perpetuating nutrition. You cannot buy corn that killed off all insects around its shadow because it has no nutrition it provides to the ecology in which you live or you go extinct leaving behind a headless corporate monster.
      (3) If you are aware that this is one essential feature of your food, you will exclude eating stuff that has no germinating/propagating power . This is good as “in theory” ; you do not have to reproduce but must have an inalienable right to do so if you so choose at a time & a place of your choice. This will naturally kill off GMOs
      (4) We are here in cooperation with a vast wonderfully balanced ecology because life all around reproduces, changes, dies to be born back again, at its own pace, which may be changing as well. Sterility is not what maintains this ecology. Be aware of this being a characteristics of your food, & this will naturally kill off GMOs. Hallmark of GMO is sterility.
      (5) This feature is integral to sustaining of the ecology. This is strictly counter to GMOs because of its sterility, they have to force GMO germination through another sterile self-limiting chemical process. Apply it, & this will naturally kill off GMOs

      The Law about suing is a direct yet soft answer to the corrupted peoples’ (some of which become Law Makers) mind of letting GMOs owners sue farmers for their self-propagating culture. If my produce is infected by GMO, then who do you think should be held responsible? Laws in place are exact opposite.

      I tried to make a speech in Europe last summer but found all my audience totally under hypnosis of their Law Makers and GMO companies! None got the true force of such awareness position specially that no one ever gave a thought to a formalized “definition” of what they consider as “food”.

      An idea whose time has come.

  2. Diana says:

    I’ve been reading your journal for several years and your writing is outstanding. Today I was browsing your online store and saw “Homestead Helper Series: Canning 101” with Anais and Jordanne and for a second I thought it was a book cover. I was so ready to buy. I know absolutely nothing about canning, but I am sure if your classes were in ebook form I could easily learn. No pressure ;D

  3. leona hawkins says:

    I’m sure to visit oftenI’m working both sides, protests and petitions, along with my second year with a raised bed garden. I’m 54 and never had a garden in my life before learning about the dangers of GMO crops. I only have about 200 sq feet in beds right now but am dreaming much bigger for the years to come as I read and learn. There is nothing quite like the satisfaction of raising crops from tiny seedlings or stepping out my back door to pick a salad. Even with my small garden I am able to keep my family of 6 flush with veggies but I really want to grow on a bigger scale, learn canning and grow enough to share with others. Your blog is an entertaining and informative site that I’m sure to visit often. Thank you for sharing your adventures and wealth of knowledge with the rest of us and long live the food revolution!

  4. leona hawkins says:

    I’m working both sides, protests and petitions, along with my second year with a raised bed garden. I’m 54 and never had a garden in my life before learning about the dangers of GMO crops. I only have about 200 sq feet in beds right now but am dreaming much bigger for the years to come as I read and learn. There is nothing quite like the satisfaction of raising crops from tiny seedlings or stepping out my back door to pick a salad. Even with my small garden I am able to keep my family of 6 flush with veggies but I really want to grow on a bigger scale, learn canning and grow enough to share with others. Your blog is an entertaining and informative site that I’m sure to visit often. Thank you for sharing your adventures and wealth of knowledge with the rest of us and long live the food revolution!

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