IN THE GARDEN

Winter tomatoes ripening on the vine

 

Lovely lettuces

More tomatoes

Still growing – towering tomatoes and lima beans greet the morning sun

It amazes me to still see some of the summer crops still growing.   Every section of the yard has some sort of microclimate – cold pockets and warm ones.

I wonder how long these summer vegs will hang on.   

It’s still really to soggy to do any real work in the garden.  It’s been a long time since we’ve been completely soaked. The mud is driving me a little crazy since it’s still wet and we are always tracking cakes of it on our boots.  Lucky for us we don’t have much carpets and we take our shoes off.

Of course we didn’t reach our 10k goal this year simply because it was a weird year weather wise.  In fact, we’ll barely squeek by with 5k pounds of produce insteaed of our annual 6k pounds.

Although it may sound like a failure to reach either the 10k or 6k goal – nothing ever is a failure only a learning experience in disguise.    Gardening teaches us one vital lesson that we are never in charge.  When you garden you grow.

I can saw with pride that this was one of the best preservation years we’ve had. 

This 10k challenge was something that we thought (and still think that can) could be pull off this little plot.  We were getting better at our succession and planting turn over rate, the fruit trees were older but if the weather doesn’t cooperate there’s no amount of work that will change the outcome to a bad year.

Will we roll over the challenge to 2009?  All I can say is that it will be interesting to see how much our 1/10 acre garden can actually produce in a good year.  We’ll just have to wait and see how 2009 growing season shapes up.  Could be a good one could be a dud.  We’ll just have to wait and see now won’t we.

What about you, will you be weighing your harvest?  It’s good to keep track of how you are doing.   That’s what really got us movtivated when we saw the actual figures of the fruits of your labor. 

Come on fess up!  What are you all dreaming, plotting and scheming in your garden next year?  Care to share?

Raining Again

Yep another storm is drenching the southland. 

Have a warm and safe holiday.

Comments(18)

  1. Wendy says:

    Right now, there’s over a foot of snow on the ground, and it’s hard to imagine my garden … I can’t even see the beds anymore ;).

    But, I resolve that in the spring, those hazelnut trees will be planted. I meant to do it last year, but never got around to it. This is the year!

  2. Wendy says:

    Right now, there’s over a foot of snow on the ground, and it’s hard to imagine my garden … I can’t even see the beds anymore ;).

    But, I resolve that in the spring, those hazelnut trees will be planted. I meant to do it last year, but never got around to it. This is the year!

  3. Talithia says:

    I plan to plant Amaranth in the front yard I live in Florida and heard a podcast that said Amaranth tolerates heat well so I’m gonna put it to the test. The podcast also stated that the young leaves could be eaten in a salad and that it’s a wonderful grain. Have you grown it. Merry late Christmas. Thank you for all the wonderful information you put out there ya’ll are the BEST

  4. Talithia says:

    I plan to plant Amaranth in the front yard I live in Florida and heard a podcast that said Amaranth tolerates heat well so I’m gonna put it to the test. The podcast also stated that the young leaves could be eaten in a salad and that it’s a wonderful grain. Have you grown it. Merry late Christmas. Thank you for all the wonderful information you put out there ya’ll are the BEST

  5. Tracy says:

    Beautiful stuff, Anais! Sure gives us spring fever to see your garden this time of year. Although we will have a little warmer weather this week, which will be a welcome break, we still have many weeks before we can put seedlings in the ground. At least we can start indoor plantings within a few weeks, which will be very fulfilling.

  6. Tracy says:

    Beautiful stuff, Anais! Sure gives us spring fever to see your garden this time of year. Although we will have a little warmer weather this week, which will be a welcome break, we still have many weeks before we can put seedlings in the ground. At least we can start indoor plantings within a few weeks, which will be very fulfilling.

  7. Bette O'Connor says:

    Thank you for the beautiful pictures. We are having a mild (so far) winter in Maryland. I am so anxious to get back into the soil 🙂 Have a blessed New Year.

  8. Bette O'Connor says:

    Thank you for the beautiful pictures. We are having a mild (so far) winter in Maryland. I am so anxious to get back into the soil 🙂 Have a blessed New Year.

  9. Fostermamas says:

    Makes me want to move west seeing all that green still growing.

    I always plot too much in the winter. Planning for next years garden is my favorite part of gardening. Next year I’m going overboard and seeing if I can keep up.

    Most of all though….I’m dreaming of chickens. I can’t wait until spring.

  10. Fostermamas says:

    Makes me want to move west seeing all that green still growing.

    I always plot too much in the winter. Planning for next years garden is my favorite part of gardening. Next year I’m going overboard and seeing if I can keep up.

    Most of all though….I’m dreaming of chickens. I can’t wait until spring.

  11. David says:

    Id love to have a winter garden here in KY. With the cold and frozen ground we cant do much of anything. Yours looks great.

  12. David says:

    Id love to have a winter garden here in KY. With the cold and frozen ground we cant do much of anything. Yours looks great.

  13. Amiga says:

    The winter experiment with a raised bed has gone well, so I plan to expand the row cover/high tunnel concept to as many beds as I can set up this year.

    I will be propagating the robust hazelnut bushes we planted a few years ago. We had a deck/catwalk built around the south and west sides of the house, so I am still designing containers for scarlet runner beans and possible other vining plants that will provide hummingbird food, beauty, human food, and passive cooling.

    The composting needs to be greatly expanded to keep up with the garden expansion. I already have found a source for chicken manure, and want to get a few other kinds, like goat and cow, to mix it up.

    A friend and I are planning to build a human-powered leaf and twig shredder.

    I have been clearing out a place for a couple of beach plum bushes and a couple of bush cherries.

    The back asparagus and herb garden needs some order imposed upon it. This is my least favorite chore, imposing order.

    Research continues on food preservation. Right now, canning and drying seem manageable. A friend has promised to teach me canning.

    I want to plant grape vines and am trying to figure out what kind of footprint they will need and where I can plant them, as my sunny spaces are limited.

    I have ordered four varieties of potatoes to grow in towers.

  14. Amiga says:

    The winter experiment with a raised bed has gone well, so I plan to expand the row cover/high tunnel concept to as many beds as I can set up this year.

    I will be propagating the robust hazelnut bushes we planted a few years ago. We had a deck/catwalk built around the south and west sides of the house, so I am still designing containers for scarlet runner beans and possible other vining plants that will provide hummingbird food, beauty, human food, and passive cooling.

    The composting needs to be greatly expanded to keep up with the garden expansion. I already have found a source for chicken manure, and want to get a few other kinds, like goat and cow, to mix it up.

    A friend and I are planning to build a human-powered leaf and twig shredder.

    I have been clearing out a place for a couple of beach plum bushes and a couple of bush cherries.

    The back asparagus and herb garden needs some order imposed upon it. This is my least favorite chore, imposing order.

    Research continues on food preservation. Right now, canning and drying seem manageable. A friend has promised to teach me canning.

    I want to plant grape vines and am trying to figure out what kind of footprint they will need and where I can plant them, as my sunny spaces are limited.

    I have ordered four varieties of potatoes to grow in towers.

  15. Meg says:

    Wow, the garden looks beautiful! I’m originally a Californian, currently in Michigan and buried under a bunch of snow, so I am experiencing definite garden envy right now!

    I wanted to drop you a line and let you guys know how much I adore the solar oven I bought from you a while back. I made Christmas dinner in the solar oven this year (I would’ve done a solstice meal, but we had several inches of snow that day and snow or grey clouds the following days, so it was pushed back to Christmas instead). I thought you might like to see one of your solar ovens, busily cooking away in the frigid north…photos are at:

    http://vintageflapper.blogspot.com/2008/12/merry-solar-xmas.html

    I love my solar oven!! The meal was partially homegrown, too…homegrown mini spaghetti squash, home grown, sliced long keeper tomatoes we had stored, homemade bread, and (non-home grown) organic refried black beans.

    ~Meg

  16. Meg says:

    Wow, the garden looks beautiful! I’m originally a Californian, currently in Michigan and buried under a bunch of snow, so I am experiencing definite garden envy right now!

    I wanted to drop you a line and let you guys know how much I adore the solar oven I bought from you a while back. I made Christmas dinner in the solar oven this year (I would’ve done a solstice meal, but we had several inches of snow that day and snow or grey clouds the following days, so it was pushed back to Christmas instead). I thought you might like to see one of your solar ovens, busily cooking away in the frigid north…photos are at:

    http://vintageflapper.blogspot.com/2008/12/merry-solar-xmas.html

    I love my solar oven!! The meal was partially homegrown, too…homegrown mini spaghetti squash, home grown, sliced long keeper tomatoes we had stored, homemade bread, and (non-home grown) organic refried black beans.

    ~Meg

  17. Lois F says:

    Your website is very inspiring and encouraging for the days we are living in. I live near Phoenix AZ and God led me to start gardening about 24 years ago. I grow melons, eggplant, and squash most summers. Right now I am thankful to be harvesting lettuces, spinach, and endive. Also, carrots and beets, radishes, scallions and oranges from our tree. The sugar peas are blooming and the parsley almost big enough to harvest. We enjoy the outdoors now but have to be in a lot in the summer in Tempe.
    Thanks for being a great example of ‘careful living’ for many people.
    Lois

  18. Lois F says:

    Your website is very inspiring and encouraging for the days we are living in. I live near Phoenix AZ and God led me to start gardening about 24 years ago. I grow melons, eggplant, and squash most summers. Right now I am thankful to be harvesting lettuces, spinach, and endive. Also, carrots and beets, radishes, scallions and oranges from our tree. The sugar peas are blooming and the parsley almost big enough to harvest. We enjoy the outdoors now but have to be in a lot in the summer in Tempe.
    Thanks for being a great example of ‘careful living’ for many people.
    Lois

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