HOMESTEAD HAPPENINGS


Backyard “winter” garden

In Search of Good Food

A documentary film tour of California’s emerging sustainable food systems write about their LA experience and stop at a super productive urban farm.


Here’s looking at you kid

Chicken Behavior

In our backyard menagerie all our animals are friendly and have their own personalities but out of all our feathered friends, Estella has the most character of all. She always comes running to greet you every time you walk into the animal enclosure and looks you square in the eye by tilting her head to the side. Of course, you can’t avoid her eye contact and ignore her wanting to “chat” so you acknowledge eye contact and make silly conservation which goes something like “hey chickie doodle” “is that right?” “yeah?” “you don’t say” then pat her head, stroke her cheeks. After our little intimate exchange, she’s content to go her merry way.


Ray has some fun

“Upscale” Gardening

A term coined by local permaculuture artist, Ray, who made our beautiful trellises out of scrap metal and who stopped by today to check out how the “giant tomato” is growing. Even though I had sent him photos he was blown away by how massive the tomato was and impressed that it was still loaded with fruit. He even spotted a few blooms thanks to the wonderfully warm weather we’ve been having.


Plantings
Getting Ready for Spring

Fruit trees (low chill anna apples) and (low chill) blueberries go back in the northwest side “sweep” along side the house.

No Comments

  1. Mia says:

    The new beds look wonderful! I hope to put some fruit trees in this year myself. Still trying to decide if I should go for semi-dwarf or dwarf. Research……. Thanks for all you do.

  2. Glynis says:

    I’m particularly interested in the next few years to see how your low chill fruits do grown organically. I would love to plant low chill varieties at our church garden and in my own garden (and maybe our community garden)

  3. Doug says:

    Howdy, do you grow indeterminate tomatoes? If so, do you train them to a single vine? Thanks