HOMESTEAD HAPPENINGS

The chickens take a nap with Blackberry.

So cute!

Hollywood is filled with news about who’s dating who, here on the urban homestead we have our own love triangle.   Our older duck, Dawn who was an item with Mr Duck now has competition from younger rivals. There’s a whole lotta flirting going on as they try to catch the eye of Mr Duck – it’s like an episode of ‘Bachelor Duck.’   Poor ol’ Dawn just can’t compete with those young hussies.   Human world, animal world – it’s all the same. 

Although have to say Mr Duck, even though his eyes wander and he gets ideas, he is still quite the gentleman. He still takes care and watches over Dawn – very sweet.

Looks like a fox has been in the hen house, feathers everywhere! No, unlikely a fox will ever been near our hen house; however, it’s molting season here on the urban homesteader.    Three new hens, are laying…. well, that is until Dora, our Golden Bantam Cochin, went on strike not liking all the work being done in the animal enclosure.    She’s just so like Dora, the Dickens character — pouty and ditzy. The new ducks should be laying any day now, could be they are too preoccupied with who’s going with Mr Duck.

The goats, now nearing the age of breeding,  have gone into heat and are a bit agitated. Fairlight even gets downright w(b)itchy. When we bought the goats Jordanne made sure to ask if their mother’s had silent heat, because all you need is a love sick goat bleating her head off at everything that moved. Well, if you had lots of acreage who would care but us urbanites have to be more considerate of the animals and our neighbors.

Carpet of salad greens

Answers From the Urban Homestead
– Square Inch Gardening
Q. How do you get your greens sown so close together? – Lucy
A. We hand sow most our greens in a method.  The greens then form a lovely carpet keeping out weeds and shading the bare soil which prevents evaporation.

Luma Apiculata

Unusual Edibles
ground cherries, yacon, crosne & luma apiculata

Here on the urban homestead we are always looking out for new, old varieties that have unfortunately found their way into obscurity. Besides the old fashionground cherries,andean yacon &asian crosne tubers and a few others another such edible that is growing in our edible eden isLuma Apiculata (which apparently, written on the tag) was Queen Victoria’s favorite. The plant sitting alone in a local nursery caught the eye of head urban farmer-homesteader, Jules who brought it home. The berries resemble blueberries and are quite pleasant.  I froze a bag of them and plan to use them in baked goods – muffins, etc.
BOOKMARKS

Georgia turns to prayer to ease drought {Yahoo}

ATLANTA – What to do when the rain won’t come? If you’re Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue, you pray. The governor will host a prayer service next week to ask for relief from the drought gripping the Southeast.
read article

Sowing the seeds of uncertainty {BBC}

Two weeks ago, for instance, the United Nations Environment Programme (Unep) published its Global Environmental Outlook – a quite devastating audit of the state of the Earth, its habitats, species and resources. A quarter of the world’s flowering plants, for instance, are now threatened with extinction over the next 50 years. There was some reasonable coverage on the day itself (especially in the Independent), but then silence. Environment going to hell in a handcart – heard it all before; so what? Or words to that effect.
read article

Sending out an S.O.S
The number of people out there today seriously worried about the health of all the plants and seeds on which modern agriculture depends must be very limited, and the number of people actively campaigning to protect them vanishingly few. … Of the Earth’s 250,000 plant species, only 200 are cultivated for food on any serious scale.
–Jonathan Porritt
Save our seeds! Here on the urban homestead we do our very best to save seeds. Of course with such a small property we can’t save every variety but do our best. Since starting our first garden here nearly 20 years ago we’ve cultivated our variety of swiss chard, new zealand spinach, celery, cherry tomatoes, lettuce to name a few which have adapted to our property.
We’ve even had folks contact us about buying seeds and tubers from us and have done so when we had enough to spare.

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  1. Wildside says:

    “When we bought the goats Jordanne made sure to ask if their mother’s had silent heat, because all you need is a love sick goat bleating her head off at everything that moved. Well, if you had lots of acreage who would care but us urbanites have to be more considerate of the animals and our neighbors.”

    Thank you for this tidbit.