HEY BIRDIES

Putting up the feeders

Groups shot.. smile!

This morning, er I should say yesterday morning (since I am now writing journal entries late, late in the evenings) a few of the girls down at Westridge High School brought over some bird feeders they made out of recycled and natural materials.

We had them hang them up in two of the fruit trees that are in the front yard.  With winter just around the corner , I am sure the wild birds that visit the urban homestead will enjoy the feeders.  I promised the girls I would try to snap a photo of birds enjpying the feeders.  I also informed them that our garden has been recognized by the National Wildlife Federation  as  Wildlife Habitat Zone.  I’ve heard many a folks say that the notice the amount of bees, butterflies and even birds that visit our garden.  It’s an oasis in the city for people and animals alike.

I’ve told everyone here to keep an eye out and want to send a call out to all neighbor birds that we got some grub.   To the girls at Westridge – thanks for thinking of us and being our friends on Facebook too!  Good luck to you and your power point presentation.

Make Your Own

There’s so many diy and crafty sites on the internet.  So if you want to make your own bird feeder out of water bottles here’s a quick video how

Why Garden For Wildlife?

Why should I create a NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat?

It’s fun! Watching wildlife in action can be fun and relaxing for everyone. Your habitat may attract beautiful songbirds, butterflies, frogs, and other interesting wildlife for viewing from your very own window.

Curb appeal! Replacing grass lawns with native wildflowers, shrubs, and trees will increase the beauty of your property and provide a nurturing refuge for wildlife.

Bring wildlife home! Restoring habitats where commercial and residential development have degraded natural ecosystems can be your way of giving back to wildlife.

Eco-friendly! Gardening practices that help wildlife, like reducing the use of chemicals, conserving energy and water, and composting also help to improve air, water and soil quality.

Community! Gardening for wildlife can help you share your love of wildlife with your neighbors and help them get involved in creating a home for wildlife.

Courtesty of NWF Certified Wildlife Habitat

Comments(4)

  1. karin says:

    Please tell those kids I thought their video was very clever! I don’t drink bottled water, but I’ll find a bottle and make one.

  2. karin says:

    Please tell those kids I thought their video was very clever! I don’t drink bottled water, but I’ll find a bottle and make one.

  3. Amy says:

    We removed a large area of lawn this spring and replaced it with cold hardy, drought tolerant plants and thick mulch. The transformation was amazing. Bees, butterflies, many dragonflies and even small birds visited the area every day. A leaf cutter bee (we didn’t even know these lived in our area!) made it’s home in a crack between the pavers of our front walk. The work was well worth the enjoyment my family gets from observing our new garden visitors.

  4. Amy says:

    We removed a large area of lawn this spring and replaced it with cold hardy, drought tolerant plants and thick mulch. The transformation was amazing. Bees, butterflies, many dragonflies and even small birds visited the area every day. A leaf cutter bee (we didn’t even know these lived in our area!) made it’s home in a crack between the pavers of our front walk. The work was well worth the enjoyment my family gets from observing our new garden visitors.

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