GOTCHA!

Jordanne caught sight of this lil critter snatching the last of the figs.  We didn’t bother scaring him/her off since we harvested enough for us and the puny, dried up fruit that’s left can be rightfully gleaned by the wildlife.

With our urban wildlife putting up stockpiles for winter, how are you going about squirreling away for the long winter?

This year has been one of the best canning years EVER here on the urban homestead.  Even with the lower than normal summer harvest

In the face of unstable economic times, what is your household doing differently this year?  Are you stockpiling like these folks? Care to share?

Comments(26)

  1. Andrea says:

    I have to say that I’m quite proud of my preserving/canning/drying efforts this year. I’ve put up nearly 700 pints of food this season, with some pears and apples yet to go. While I’ve always done a bit of canning, this year it’s taken top priority over all else. Here in Ohio, our garden is all but finished, but we have plenty of fresh, nutritious food put away for those dark days of winter.

    I wouldn’t say that we’re stockpiling necessarily, but we’re definitely stocking up a bit more than usual. A little extra rice, beans, flour, pasta, popcorn, sugar, etc never hurt anyone, right? Other steps we’re taking to cut expenses include:

    *drastically cutting back on meat

    *installing a woodstove

    *gathering ‘free’ food (walnuts, berries, etc.)

    *insulating, insulating, insulating

    * praying more than ever LOL…

  2. Andrea says:

    I have to say that I’m quite proud of my preserving/canning/drying efforts this year. I’ve put up nearly 700 pints of food this season, with some pears and apples yet to go. While I’ve always done a bit of canning, this year it’s taken top priority over all else. Here in Ohio, our garden is all but finished, but we have plenty of fresh, nutritious food put away for those dark days of winter.

    I wouldn’t say that we’re stockpiling necessarily, but we’re definitely stocking up a bit more than usual. A little extra rice, beans, flour, pasta, popcorn, sugar, etc never hurt anyone, right? Other steps we’re taking to cut expenses include:

    *drastically cutting back on meat

    *installing a woodstove

    *gathering ‘free’ food (walnuts, berries, etc.)

    *insulating, insulating, insulating

    * praying more than ever LOL…

  3. Angela says:

    Yes, I have been busy canning: at least two cases each of blackberry jam, raspberry jam, crabapple jelly, apple butter, pickles, brandied pears, tomatoes, and pear butter. The blackberries, raspberries, and crabapples were local, wild, and free. The pears, apples, tomatoes, and cucumbers were from local organic farms. I also bought 25 pounds each of local organic garbanzos and pinto beans. I still have green tomatoes to pick and pickle. I did dry big bunches of parsley and basil from the garden, and used some fresh basil in the stewed tomatoes that I canned. We went to Territorial Seed Company today to stock up on seeds for spring. And, on the planning front, rather than the preserving front, we have found a stud to service our Pygmy does so that we can start milking them after they kid. We just moved here in June, so I was not able to put in a proper garden in time, but we did have a respectable harvest of table veggies and herbs, just not enough to preserve, hence the trips to local organic farms. It doesn’t feel like enough to sustain a family of five, but it is a good start!

  4. Angela says:

    Yes, I have been busy canning: at least two cases each of blackberry jam, raspberry jam, crabapple jelly, apple butter, pickles, brandied pears, tomatoes, and pear butter. The blackberries, raspberries, and crabapples were local, wild, and free. The pears, apples, tomatoes, and cucumbers were from local organic farms. I also bought 25 pounds each of local organic garbanzos and pinto beans. I still have green tomatoes to pick and pickle. I did dry big bunches of parsley and basil from the garden, and used some fresh basil in the stewed tomatoes that I canned. We went to Territorial Seed Company today to stock up on seeds for spring. And, on the planning front, rather than the preserving front, we have found a stud to service our Pygmy does so that we can start milking them after they kid. We just moved here in June, so I was not able to put in a proper garden in time, but we did have a respectable harvest of table veggies and herbs, just not enough to preserve, hence the trips to local organic farms. It doesn’t feel like enough to sustain a family of five, but it is a good start!

  5. daniel L says:

    ” beans ,BULLETS!, and band aids” WOW

  6. daniel L says:

    ” beans ,BULLETS!, and band aids” WOW

  7. Living The Frugal Life says:

    We had our biggest garden ever this year, and I learned to can this year. I didn’t can all that much, just tomato sauce and chili pepper salsa. But I got a dehydrator to, so I have dried pumpkin and dried apple-smoked tomatoes. A lot of other stuff went into our chest freezer. We got four laying hens this year. Also, we’ve been gleaning more fruit this year. We’re refining our garden plan for next year, and replacing two old, sickly, non-productive trees with cherry trees next spring. So maybe more to can next year!

  8. Living The Frugal Life says:

    We had our biggest garden ever this year, and I learned to can this year. I didn’t can all that much, just tomato sauce and chili pepper salsa. But I got a dehydrator to, so I have dried pumpkin and dried apple-smoked tomatoes. A lot of other stuff went into our chest freezer. We got four laying hens this year. Also, we’ve been gleaning more fruit this year. We’re refining our garden plan for next year, and replacing two old, sickly, non-productive trees with cherry trees next spring. So maybe more to can next year!

  9. Sue says:

    What an adorable photograph!

    My preserving efforts have been mainly apples, then green beans and finally onions. Other than that we’ve eaten everything.

  10. Sue says:

    What an adorable photograph!

    My preserving efforts have been mainly apples, then green beans and finally onions. Other than that we’ve eaten everything.

  11. Beth says:

    Canning canning canning! Freezing too. I’ve also began making more convenience foods from scratch so our grocery bill isn’t so high. Gonna try greenhouse gardening this winter with a few things.

  12. Beth says:

    Canning canning canning! Freezing too. I’ve also began making more convenience foods from scratch so our grocery bill isn’t so high. Gonna try greenhouse gardening this winter with a few things.

  13. connie in nm says:

    My tiny garden did really well this year. We ate fresh vegetables all summer and I froze and dried squash, tomatoes, black eyed peas , a few green beans, bell peppers, green chile and jalepenos ( I make my own salsa). I will keep some yeast biscuit dough in the fridge (I had kinda stopped that when kids left home) and I always cook from scratch.

    A cold north wind is blowing today and it will get down to 38 tonight. I have a small patch of lettuce just coming up. I will cover it with bubble wrap weighted down at edges. I can usually keep lettuce all winter that way. Our winters are mild, but we do have cold spells where it goes below freezing. So, I use the bubble wrap when necessary. Will also move in the pot of lemon verbena today. Moved the Meyer Lemon in yesterday and it is loaded with fruit.

  14. connie in nm says:

    My tiny garden did really well this year. We ate fresh vegetables all summer and I froze and dried squash, tomatoes, black eyed peas , a few green beans, bell peppers, green chile and jalepenos ( I make my own salsa). I will keep some yeast biscuit dough in the fridge (I had kinda stopped that when kids left home) and I always cook from scratch.

    A cold north wind is blowing today and it will get down to 38 tonight. I have a small patch of lettuce just coming up. I will cover it with bubble wrap weighted down at edges. I can usually keep lettuce all winter that way. Our winters are mild, but we do have cold spells where it goes below freezing. So, I use the bubble wrap when necessary. Will also move in the pot of lemon verbena today. Moved the Meyer Lemon in yesterday and it is loaded with fruit.

  15. Meg says:

    This is the first year I’ve really hunkered down and done a lot of canning. (Your canning pictures inspired me that I really could do it!) My cellar has jars and jars of pears, pickles, and jams. My freezer is fuller than it’s ever been with freezer jams, salsas, applesauce, grape juice and more. I’ve got a nice supply of organic, grass-fed meat in there too- and my big tubs of flour, oatmeal, and sugar are full. I know it won’t be enough to get us all the way though the winter, but it will good way to measure how much we’ll need for next year. We’re already down to our last jar of old-fashioned chili sauce 😉 D’oh!

  16. Meg says:

    This is the first year I’ve really hunkered down and done a lot of canning. (Your canning pictures inspired me that I really could do it!) My cellar has jars and jars of pears, pickles, and jams. My freezer is fuller than it’s ever been with freezer jams, salsas, applesauce, grape juice and more. I’ve got a nice supply of organic, grass-fed meat in there too- and my big tubs of flour, oatmeal, and sugar are full. I know it won’t be enough to get us all the way though the winter, but it will good way to measure how much we’ll need for next year. We’re already down to our last jar of old-fashioned chili sauce 😉 D’oh!

  17. KK says:

    I did some canning for the first time…apple sauce, some plum jams, and even some catsup we had so many tomatoes! They all turned out good, but the canning process is so much work, you have to commit a lot of time to it to make it worth the effort. I’ve been drying apples and figs, and put them in the freezer, also making soups, stocks, and sauces to put in the freezer. Now I’m out of freezer space! We’ve also stocked up on rice and beans in large amounts so we won’t actually starve when the global economy really goes into the toilet. But we are entering into some dark times ahead, and it’s up to all of us forward thinking types to help shine some light in the dark! Thanks to PTF for helping light the way.

  18. KK says:

    I did some canning for the first time…apple sauce, some plum jams, and even some catsup we had so many tomatoes! They all turned out good, but the canning process is so much work, you have to commit a lot of time to it to make it worth the effort. I’ve been drying apples and figs, and put them in the freezer, also making soups, stocks, and sauces to put in the freezer. Now I’m out of freezer space! We’ve also stocked up on rice and beans in large amounts so we won’t actually starve when the global economy really goes into the toilet. But we are entering into some dark times ahead, and it’s up to all of us forward thinking types to help shine some light in the dark! Thanks to PTF for helping light the way.

  19. Susan says:

    I have been doing raised beds like yours, it’s the first time I’ve really tried to garden in several years (hay bale garden that lasted through most of the winter was my last try) and the largest attempt since my kids were small.

    I’ve dried apples and red chiles, made spaghetti sauce, roasted and frozen green chiles and red peppers and pesto and zucchini, bought pullets who will hopefully start laying in Feb, preserved pickles, jellies, jams, fruit butters, beets, and more. This is my first effort at doing this stuff since I became an adult — I grew up doing it and we would even can venison that my dad shot. We have been mostly insulated from the increases in food costs because of the garden — I don’t think we bought produce more than three or four times all growing season.

    DH thinks I’m nuts but I feel good about having stuff put away. I’ve also been buying bags of beans whenever I shop and have a large store of many types of beans put up.

    I plan to get a grain mill, Lehman’s is back ordered on the one I want so hopefully by the end of the month they’ll have them back in — and I will be buying wheat in bulk once I get it.

    And the fall garden goes in this Sunday.

  20. Susan says:

    I have been doing raised beds like yours, it’s the first time I’ve really tried to garden in several years (hay bale garden that lasted through most of the winter was my last try) and the largest attempt since my kids were small.

    I’ve dried apples and red chiles, made spaghetti sauce, roasted and frozen green chiles and red peppers and pesto and zucchini, bought pullets who will hopefully start laying in Feb, preserved pickles, jellies, jams, fruit butters, beets, and more. This is my first effort at doing this stuff since I became an adult — I grew up doing it and we would even can venison that my dad shot. We have been mostly insulated from the increases in food costs because of the garden — I don’t think we bought produce more than three or four times all growing season.

    DH thinks I’m nuts but I feel good about having stuff put away. I’ve also been buying bags of beans whenever I shop and have a large store of many types of beans put up.

    I plan to get a grain mill, Lehman’s is back ordered on the one I want so hopefully by the end of the month they’ll have them back in — and I will be buying wheat in bulk once I get it.

    And the fall garden goes in this Sunday.

  21. Laurie says:

    Cute squirrel! We let critters glean a little too, it seems like the right thing to do.

    Like you, we’ve got lots of home-grown preserved – it’s a great feeling! But while we’ve been floating along here at home eating fresh all summer, prices of staple goods have gone way up. I was quite shocked when we did our fall stock-up on flour, sugar, pasta, nuts and grains. Yikes!

    Here in Wisconsin, we are mostly done with gardening and canning, and I’ve taken up my caulking gun and storm windows now. Like Andrea says, “insulate,insulate,insulate”!

  22. Laurie says:

    Cute squirrel! We let critters glean a little too, it seems like the right thing to do.

    Like you, we’ve got lots of home-grown preserved – it’s a great feeling! But while we’ve been floating along here at home eating fresh all summer, prices of staple goods have gone way up. I was quite shocked when we did our fall stock-up on flour, sugar, pasta, nuts and grains. Yikes!

    Here in Wisconsin, we are mostly done with gardening and canning, and I’ve taken up my caulking gun and storm windows now. Like Andrea says, “insulate,insulate,insulate”!

  23. Wendy says:

    I don’t know that we’re doing anything “differently”, but at the same time, over the past two years, our entire lives have changed in anticipation of what is now happening. It’s weird to look back over the past two years, having been watching the signs all of this time, and wow! All of those folks who predicted this, were right. Makes me glad I listened, and ignored my husband when he rolled his eyes and told me I was crazy (for wanting to replace our failed septic system with a composting toilet instead of the septic tank and leech field he wanted (and got!)).

    So, we’ve done more canning than we ever did. I’ve planted a “fall” garden for the first time, and my peas are actually flowering (it’s a lovely sight to behold!). We have enough firewood for three years (hopefully). We’re driving less, reducing our debt, and generally, being more aware than we were.

    I think it’s sad to see how surprised people are by what’s happening, and even sadder to see how hard-hit many people have been.

  24. Wendy says:

    I don’t know that we’re doing anything “differently”, but at the same time, over the past two years, our entire lives have changed in anticipation of what is now happening. It’s weird to look back over the past two years, having been watching the signs all of this time, and wow! All of those folks who predicted this, were right. Makes me glad I listened, and ignored my husband when he rolled his eyes and told me I was crazy (for wanting to replace our failed septic system with a composting toilet instead of the septic tank and leech field he wanted (and got!)).

    So, we’ve done more canning than we ever did. I’ve planted a “fall” garden for the first time, and my peas are actually flowering (it’s a lovely sight to behold!). We have enough firewood for three years (hopefully). We’re driving less, reducing our debt, and generally, being more aware than we were.

    I think it’s sad to see how surprised people are by what’s happening, and even sadder to see how hard-hit many people have been.

  25. Throwback at Trapper Creek says:

    Despite a slow, cool start to our summer garden, we have canned large amounts of food, just about finishing up with the preserving, and already are starting to eat our winter greenhouse crops.

    We’ve also helped a few people learn how to garden differently to ensure a more consistent food supply for themselves.

    All in all, it feels good to be stocked up for the coming hard times.

  26. Throwback at Trapper Creek says:

    Despite a slow, cool start to our summer garden, we have canned large amounts of food, just about finishing up with the preserving, and already are starting to eat our winter greenhouse crops.

    We’ve also helped a few people learn how to garden differently to ensure a more consistent food supply for themselves.

    All in all, it feels good to be stocked up for the coming hard times.

Post a comment