FREEDOM GARDENER OF THE MONTH

With so much news happening, I am afraid urban homestead happenings take second fiddle to the goings on around us.

Though I know most of you are probably more interested in what Fairlight is doing these days or how we are dealing with the harlequin bug infestestation, this blog not only is a sounding board for what goes on in our lives but of those impacted and inspired by our outreach and website.  It’s growing into a family of kindred spirits.

On our sister site the Freedom Gardener of the month has been announced and awarded.  So mosey on over and read about this inspiring couple’s homestead just north of the border.

Freedom Gardeners

Growing for 21st century food security, Freedom Gardens is an online social community of gardening enthusiasts who are fed up with foreign oil, frequent food miles and high food prices.

And if you haven’t signed up on Freedom Gardens, whatcha waiting for?   We have signess from Sweden, Portugal, Australia, Jordan and more.

Start growing community. Our earth you dig it!

Comments(8)

  1. Ann Erdman says:

    I appreciate your site and have added you to my local blogroll. Today I posted an item about the City of Pasadena’s online green training program, which I hope you’ll take if you haven’t done so already.

  2. Ann Erdman says:

    I appreciate your site and have added you to my local blogroll. Today I posted an item about the City of Pasadena’s online green training program, which I hope you’ll take if you haven’t done so already.

  3. Ron Honn says:

    I really admire what you guys are doing out there–you’re the research and development team for what will surely be the future of farming (even though most people may not realize it yet). Having read Michael Pollan’s article in the N.Y. Times Magazine, “Our Decrepit Food Factories”–

    http://www.michaelpollan.com/article.php?id=91

    –it’s pretty obvious we need to de-centralize farming as much as and as deliberately as possible.

    I moved from Los Angeles several years ago, in part inspired by the work of the Dervaes family, purchased outright 10.5 acres of land 7 miles S. of Stillwater, Oklahoma and at present…well, I’m stuck. I’ve taken stewardship of a pretty beautiful piece of land and I adore it here–the views of the Milky Way are to die for, and for now I’m just sitting on it and letting it stay pretty wild (keeping it from being developed into tri-level home with golf-course English lawn), but am not quite sure how to proceed. There’s only one of me, and I still have to work for a living!

    I’m all ears if anyone has an idea of how I might create a cooperative/partnership to develop a sustainable farm, I’m land rich, and a little cash-and-time poor, but with the right kindred spirits, I can’t imagine we couldn’t make this work right here in the middle of Oklahoma…and we have pretty much three growing seasons…so if anyone has any suggestions or is interested in partnering into a working farm in Oklahoma, let me know!

    I know this is the right thing to do, and I can’t imagine a cooler adventure for the next part of my life, and I’m dedicated to utilizing this land in a sustainable way.

    Peace and Happiness,
    Ron Honn

    P.S. and at the risk of appearing totally obtuse, slow on the uptake, and technologically uncool, how do I sign up for Freedom Gardens?

  4. Ron Honn says:

    I really admire what you guys are doing out there–you’re the research and development team for what will surely be the future of farming (even though most people may not realize it yet). Having read Michael Pollan’s article in the N.Y. Times Magazine, “Our Decrepit Food Factories”–

    http://www.michaelpollan.com/article.php?id=91

    –it’s pretty obvious we need to de-centralize farming as much as and as deliberately as possible.

    I moved from Los Angeles several years ago, in part inspired by the work of the Dervaes family, purchased outright 10.5 acres of land 7 miles S. of Stillwater, Oklahoma and at present…well, I’m stuck. I’ve taken stewardship of a pretty beautiful piece of land and I adore it here–the views of the Milky Way are to die for, and for now I’m just sitting on it and letting it stay pretty wild (keeping it from being developed into tri-level home with golf-course English lawn), but am not quite sure how to proceed. There’s only one of me, and I still have to work for a living!

    I’m all ears if anyone has an idea of how I might create a cooperative/partnership to develop a sustainable farm, I’m land rich, and a little cash-and-time poor, but with the right kindred spirits, I can’t imagine we couldn’t make this work right here in the middle of Oklahoma…and we have pretty much three growing seasons…so if anyone has any suggestions or is interested in partnering into a working farm in Oklahoma, let me know!

    I know this is the right thing to do, and I can’t imagine a cooler adventure for the next part of my life, and I’m dedicated to utilizing this land in a sustainable way.

    Peace and Happiness,
    Ron Honn

    P.S. and at the risk of appearing totally obtuse, slow on the uptake, and technologically uncool, how do I sign up for Freedom Gardens?

  5. Ron Honn says:

    Okaynevermind. Got the Freedom Gardens part figured out.

    But still, if anyone is interested or has ideas about how to form a sustainable farm business in Oklahoma, feel free to drop me a note: ronhonn@yahoo.com

  6. Ron Honn says:

    Okaynevermind. Got the Freedom Gardens part figured out.

    But still, if anyone is interested or has ideas about how to form a sustainable farm business in Oklahoma, feel free to drop me a note: ronhonn@yahoo.com

  7. redclay says:

    Dervaes Family:
    those kindred spirits that you speak of are due to your hard work and dedication. None of this would have happened if it wasn’t for the fact that you all spend so much of your effort on the sharing aspect of your work. No doubt your lives would be simpler if you didn’t have the added responsibility of maintaining the various sites and all of the civic programs…but our lives would be lacking. On behalf of those who see what you do and then become local agents of change in our own families and communities, thank you and please please, please, don’t become discouraged while looking at the list of things that you would still like to accomplish.

  8. redclay says:

    Dervaes Family:
    those kindred spirits that you speak of are due to your hard work and dedication. None of this would have happened if it wasn’t for the fact that you all spend so much of your effort on the sharing aspect of your work. No doubt your lives would be simpler if you didn’t have the added responsibility of maintaining the various sites and all of the civic programs…but our lives would be lacking. On behalf of those who see what you do and then become local agents of change in our own families and communities, thank you and please please, please, don’t become discouraged while looking at the list of things that you would still like to accomplish.

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