FALL?

Peppers, apples, peaches, figs and beans

Larder of homegrown goods – shelves are fiilling up fast

Summer garden

Little farm in the city

It’s co-op pick up time! (note: not all ours, we picked up for four other people)

It’s been the coolest August that we can remember.  Nippy (foggy) mornings, cool evening and pleasant days.  It’s August right?  Just checking to see if we are the same calendar as everyone else.

Has the weather been wacky where you are?

I wonder, does this mean we’ll have a hotter than normal fall?   The poor summer crops haven’t a clue what season it is.  Not only are they clueless but the pest are out in force this season – spider mites, harlequin bugs, mildew.

The crop mostly effected this summer growing season was the tomatoes.  Not only ours but seems everyones tomatoes were just off.  Sure, we harvested and are harvesting tomatoes but not in the amount that we normally harvest (almost 1,000 lbs)   Justin says we’ll be lucky if we get 1/2 that this year.   What’s bad for some is good weather for others.  The avocado and figs are producing like gangbusters.

We are gambling that temperature will warm up a bit in fall for another round of warm weather crops before we turn over the garden into cooler weather rotation.   So we are out there planting another go around of tomatoes, cucumbers, beans, squash and peppers.    August is the last planting month for most of the summer crops, come September it’s salad greens, pea, broccoli and cabbage time.

A slew of preservation continues to manage the onslaught of the summer harvest.  Our cabinets are certainly filling up with surplus – food security for the long winter!

How’s your growing and preservation efforts coming along?

Comments(54)

  1. Kory says:

    It has been ridiculously cold here in NY, I caught a couple leaves on the trees turning already. The tomatoes and corn are not happy. I sure hope it warms up.

  2. Kory says:

    It has been ridiculously cold here in NY, I caught a couple leaves on the trees turning already. The tomatoes and corn are not happy. I sure hope it warms up.

  3. tevebaugh says:

    Here in U.S. zone 7B (central Arkansas), it was scorching until two weeks ago. Then, the second week of August, we got reprieve. It’s been raining on and off ever since, and has been downright chilly nearly every other day. Strange.

    My carrots have perked up since they’re getting less of the beating southern sun, and the eight-ball squash, which had lapsed for a while, is starting to flower again.

  4. tevebaugh says:

    Here in U.S. zone 7B (central Arkansas), it was scorching until two weeks ago. Then, the second week of August, we got reprieve. It’s been raining on and off ever since, and has been downright chilly nearly every other day. Strange.

    My carrots have perked up since they’re getting less of the beating southern sun, and the eight-ball squash, which had lapsed for a while, is starting to flower again.

  5. Sherry says:

    Illinois is having the same issues with slow producing tomatoes and lots of bugs. Here, a nice hard freeze will help with the bug problem for next year. Our blackberries are abundant this year though. We just started four gallons of wine and I’m starting on jam. The apples and peaches are great this year. I love Fall!

  6. Sherry says:

    Illinois is having the same issues with slow producing tomatoes and lots of bugs. Here, a nice hard freeze will help with the bug problem for next year. Our blackberries are abundant this year though. We just started four gallons of wine and I’m starting on jam. The apples and peaches are great this year. I love Fall!

  7. P~ says:

    Yeah, the weather has been off here too. The Spring went on forever and was cold and then Summer came on hot and heavy and everything is just not growing as I would like. I’ve learned some things about the micro-climates in my yard from it this year though, so that’s the upside. Just another reason for bio-diversity right?
    Glad to know it’s not just me.
    P~

  8. P~ says:

    Yeah, the weather has been off here too. The Spring went on forever and was cold and then Summer came on hot and heavy and everything is just not growing as I would like. I’ve learned some things about the micro-climates in my yard from it this year though, so that’s the upside. Just another reason for bio-diversity right?
    Glad to know it’s not just me.
    P~

  9. Jan says:

    I am canning quarts of tomatoes right now but I am only having enough to can 3 or 4 quarts at a time. Unlike most years where I have to give them away to keep up with the tomatoes. I am at least happy we are getting some. I just went and picked an apple from our tree and having a bit of a snack. They are so good, first apple off our tree, well a ripe apple anyways!! LOL
    Our weather is weird also. Our peaches didnt get very big this year but they are there. We could use some rain, its really dry.

  10. Jan says:

    I am canning quarts of tomatoes right now but I am only having enough to can 3 or 4 quarts at a time. Unlike most years where I have to give them away to keep up with the tomatoes. I am at least happy we are getting some. I just went and picked an apple from our tree and having a bit of a snack. They are so good, first apple off our tree, well a ripe apple anyways!! LOL
    Our weather is weird also. Our peaches didnt get very big this year but they are there. We could use some rain, its really dry.

  11. Susan says:

    I am canning this year for the first time as an adult — so far I’ve put up a dozen jars of strawberry jam, 12 jars cherry jam, 12 jars apricot jam, 11 jars apricot butter, 6 quarts of peaches (and more to come), 2 1/2 quarts pickled beets (these are for my adult children as Christmas presents, they really are that loved in my house) and more to come as I have lots of beets in the garden just waiting for the pot. I also roasted 10 lbs green chiles from the local market, am drying red peppers as they come ripe from our own plants, and am blanching and freezing our tomatoes until I have enough to make one giant batch of spaghetti sauce. I have also frozen 17 bags so far of shredded zucchini in premeasured 3 cup batches — exactly what I need for zucchini bread or cookies; I have 5 or 6 zucchs in the fridge waiting their turn at the shredder as well. I dried 3 lbs of green beans rather than can because I really hate them overcooked, and I wanted to see how they would cook up this winter.

  12. Susan says:

    I am canning this year for the first time as an adult — so far I’ve put up a dozen jars of strawberry jam, 12 jars cherry jam, 12 jars apricot jam, 11 jars apricot butter, 6 quarts of peaches (and more to come), 2 1/2 quarts pickled beets (these are for my adult children as Christmas presents, they really are that loved in my house) and more to come as I have lots of beets in the garden just waiting for the pot. I also roasted 10 lbs green chiles from the local market, am drying red peppers as they come ripe from our own plants, and am blanching and freezing our tomatoes until I have enough to make one giant batch of spaghetti sauce. I have also frozen 17 bags so far of shredded zucchini in premeasured 3 cup batches — exactly what I need for zucchini bread or cookies; I have 5 or 6 zucchs in the fridge waiting their turn at the shredder as well. I dried 3 lbs of green beans rather than can because I really hate them overcooked, and I wanted to see how they would cook up this winter.

  13. Meadowwood Garden says:

    Too funny! Less than 12 hours ago I wrote a similar post about the strange weather this year. Not only do great minds think alike, they seem to be experiencing the same crazy weather too!

    Here in Ohio Zone 5b the farmers are loving it because the corn and soybeans took off early and it looks to be a record harvest year. But all the home gardeners in the area have been struggling. It is almost as if we lost a month somewhere — weather-wise we went from June to August and somehow July was skipped.

    Home vegetable gardening is undergoing a huge resurgence this year. I’m wondering how many of the new gardeners will experience poor harvests due to this freaky weather and become so disappointed they decide gardening isn’t worth it. Wouldn’t that be a shame?

    I’m chalking up this year to “learning to be adaptable.” Things have a way of evening out over time.

    Brian

  14. Meadowwood Garden says:

    Too funny! Less than 12 hours ago I wrote a similar post about the strange weather this year. Not only do great minds think alike, they seem to be experiencing the same crazy weather too!

    Here in Ohio Zone 5b the farmers are loving it because the corn and soybeans took off early and it looks to be a record harvest year. But all the home gardeners in the area have been struggling. It is almost as if we lost a month somewhere — weather-wise we went from June to August and somehow July was skipped.

    Home vegetable gardening is undergoing a huge resurgence this year. I’m wondering how many of the new gardeners will experience poor harvests due to this freaky weather and become so disappointed they decide gardening isn’t worth it. Wouldn’t that be a shame?

    I’m chalking up this year to “learning to be adaptable.” Things have a way of evening out over time.

    Brian

  15. Living The Frugal Life says:

    When I woke up, it was 50 degrees outside this morning. I live near Philadelphia. Last week we had a day with a high temperature of 68! It should be sweltering and sticky here. So I can’t complain too much. It’s another day to bake some zucchini bread.

    Our beefsteak tomatoes are coming in now, the cherries have been coming in for weeks.

    I am in awe of your stocked pantry shelves. I’ve only just begun canning this year. And so far, only the tomato sauce seems to be a success. Fortunately, the popcorn, soup beans, sugar pumpkins, and potatoes don’t need canning. The chest freezer has come in handy for the kale and chard. I plan to use it to store our beets and cabbage as borscht. And the parsnips can just stay in the ground as far as I’m concerned. Must figure out where the fall crop of lettuce is going to go…

    cheers,

    Kate

  16. Living The Frugal Life says:

    When I woke up, it was 50 degrees outside this morning. I live near Philadelphia. Last week we had a day with a high temperature of 68! It should be sweltering and sticky here. So I can’t complain too much. It’s another day to bake some zucchini bread.

    Our beefsteak tomatoes are coming in now, the cherries have been coming in for weeks.

    I am in awe of your stocked pantry shelves. I’ve only just begun canning this year. And so far, only the tomato sauce seems to be a success. Fortunately, the popcorn, soup beans, sugar pumpkins, and potatoes don’t need canning. The chest freezer has come in handy for the kale and chard. I plan to use it to store our beets and cabbage as borscht. And the parsnips can just stay in the ground as far as I’m concerned. Must figure out where the fall crop of lettuce is going to go…

    cheers,

    Kate

  17. Belle says:

    The tomatoes have been so slow this year. I finally have some but the production is nowhere near what it has been in the past. Most of my plants have barely hit 6 feet tall.

    It’s been so cool that I am starting to plant fall vegetables already. I even had a couple of direct seeded cabbages come up.

    I’m planning on starting to can or freeze stuff this year. We shall see what works.

  18. Belle says:

    The tomatoes have been so slow this year. I finally have some but the production is nowhere near what it has been in the past. Most of my plants have barely hit 6 feet tall.

    It’s been so cool that I am starting to plant fall vegetables already. I even had a couple of direct seeded cabbages come up.

    I’m planning on starting to can or freeze stuff this year. We shall see what works.

  19. Chicago Mike says:

    I second that on the tomatos in Illinois. Mine finally started ripening just a couple of days ago. Its slightly cooler than would have been expected. Fortunately that means that my lettuce has not bolted and I am still getting lots of tasty lettuce.

    We got all the stuff to start canning, but we are afraid to try it for some reason. Got to get over the nervous and get on with the Go.

    We are drying herbs and hot peppers though, hopefully we will have enough to get through the winter.

  20. Chicago Mike says:

    I second that on the tomatos in Illinois. Mine finally started ripening just a couple of days ago. Its slightly cooler than would have been expected. Fortunately that means that my lettuce has not bolted and I am still getting lots of tasty lettuce.

    We got all the stuff to start canning, but we are afraid to try it for some reason. Got to get over the nervous and get on with the Go.

    We are drying herbs and hot peppers though, hopefully we will have enough to get through the winter.

  21. margie says:

    I love your site, and ideas. I believe in earth stewardship, but I question the green movement .My question is ” where did the global warming go to?” I thought in the 70’s it was global cooling that people were talking about? I just think it is a little odd that the same people that are preaching “global footprint” use more energy than my whole town. Sounds like another way just to be taxed to me. They should practice what they preach. Just some thoughts. blessings M

  22. margie says:

    I love your site, and ideas. I believe in earth stewardship, but I question the green movement .My question is ” where did the global warming go to?” I thought in the 70’s it was global cooling that people were talking about? I just think it is a little odd that the same people that are preaching “global footprint” use more energy than my whole town. Sounds like another way just to be taxed to me. They should practice what they preach. Just some thoughts. blessings M

  23. Joy says:

    Margie,

    In response to your question “where did the global warming go to?”, I think it came up here to Canada (SE Alberta). 🙂

    We’ve been blessed with very warm weather this summer and my garden has been growing like gang-busters. We’ve had high temperatures for the past several weeks in the neighborhood of 30-36 degrees celcius (86-96 degrees fahrenheit).

    Been canning, freezing, and drying. I need to quit my full-time job to keep up!

    Hope the weather settles down for you Anais!

  24. Joy says:

    Margie,

    In response to your question “where did the global warming go to?”, I think it came up here to Canada (SE Alberta). 🙂

    We’ve been blessed with very warm weather this summer and my garden has been growing like gang-busters. We’ve had high temperatures for the past several weeks in the neighborhood of 30-36 degrees celcius (86-96 degrees fahrenheit).

    Been canning, freezing, and drying. I need to quit my full-time job to keep up!

    Hope the weather settles down for you Anais!

  25. Kim says:

    This has been the coolest summer since I was expecting my daughter 17 years ago. It was a cold spring and then losts of rain for the start of the summer which I thought was a good thing but since have lost half of my peach crop to brown rot. Now it is very dry and crispy. Nothing is doing very well here in southern PA except the cherry tomatoes. I have been picking them everyday. Everyone jokes about how big their zucchini crop is but I am zuchinni challenged. Can’t grow a single one. They keep rotting before they even get big enough to eat. Oh well there is always next season:) and friends with extra zuchinni!!!

  26. Kim says:

    This has been the coolest summer since I was expecting my daughter 17 years ago. It was a cold spring and then losts of rain for the start of the summer which I thought was a good thing but since have lost half of my peach crop to brown rot. Now it is very dry and crispy. Nothing is doing very well here in southern PA except the cherry tomatoes. I have been picking them everyday. Everyone jokes about how big their zucchini crop is but I am zuchinni challenged. Can’t grow a single one. They keep rotting before they even get big enough to eat. Oh well there is always next season:) and friends with extra zuchinni!!!

  27. Paulo says:

    Hello Anais,

    I can reply for two countries. We are from Portugal and living now in Austria. In Vienna, Austria (continental climate) its been a hotter than average summer, but much wetter, with a record of thunderstorms. It has been like that since early spring, which is unusually warm.
    In Portugal (Mediterranean climate) its been a unusually cold and wet summer. This unusual cool weather since early spring, but February was record warm there.

    I can say that worldwide cold climate in 2008 is both due to lower solar activity and cyclical changes in ocean circulation (one example is La Nina). If nature-induce changes can be stronger and offset the warm induced by human activity no one knows for sure, but by natural cycles we will probably enter gradually a generally colder and drier period in early 21st century. Even more, some recent volcanic activity will help to bring a colder 2009. Permaculture solutions and a great biodiversity in our gardens will be however key solutions for these changes.

  28. Paulo says:

    Hello Anais,

    I can reply for two countries. We are from Portugal and living now in Austria. In Vienna, Austria (continental climate) its been a hotter than average summer, but much wetter, with a record of thunderstorms. It has been like that since early spring, which is unusually warm.
    In Portugal (Mediterranean climate) its been a unusually cold and wet summer. This unusual cool weather since early spring, but February was record warm there.

    I can say that worldwide cold climate in 2008 is both due to lower solar activity and cyclical changes in ocean circulation (one example is La Nina). If nature-induce changes can be stronger and offset the warm induced by human activity no one knows for sure, but by natural cycles we will probably enter gradually a generally colder and drier period in early 21st century. Even more, some recent volcanic activity will help to bring a colder 2009. Permaculture solutions and a great biodiversity in our gardens will be however key solutions for these changes.

  29. Cindie K. says:

    We have been harvesting beautiful and abundant green beans for several days. I blanche and freeze them, which has worked well for us. One of my goals is to learn to can, but so far, our we’ve focused on freezing. I am also freezing peppers, onions, and tomatoes. Our pet tortoises eat homegrown cherry tomatoes all year long! I put them tomatoes in chili, soups, sauces, etc. I also freeze green ones for fried green tomatoes throughout the year. Interestingly, they retain most of their firmness in the freezing process. We will begin harvesting and freezing corn this weekend. Such abundance!

  30. Cindie K. says:

    We have been harvesting beautiful and abundant green beans for several days. I blanche and freeze them, which has worked well for us. One of my goals is to learn to can, but so far, our we’ve focused on freezing. I am also freezing peppers, onions, and tomatoes. Our pet tortoises eat homegrown cherry tomatoes all year long! I put them tomatoes in chili, soups, sauces, etc. I also freeze green ones for fried green tomatoes throughout the year. Interestingly, they retain most of their firmness in the freezing process. We will begin harvesting and freezing corn this weekend. Such abundance!

  31. Naise says:

    I commented on another site about tomatoes just yesterday. I have had not one ripe tomato this season. Usually I can’t keep up with production. This year I switched to grow biointensive, and heirloom varieties only. I thought the slowness of production was due to my ignorance of both method and variety. Apparently it’s a common thing. A friend in Temecula Valley said she had no bees to pollinate, so she had no fruit.
    As far as weather, here in NC, the leaves are starting to yellow, and there’s been a definte fall feel in the air.

  32. Naise says:

    I commented on another site about tomatoes just yesterday. I have had not one ripe tomato this season. Usually I can’t keep up with production. This year I switched to grow biointensive, and heirloom varieties only. I thought the slowness of production was due to my ignorance of both method and variety. Apparently it’s a common thing. A friend in Temecula Valley said she had no bees to pollinate, so she had no fruit.
    As far as weather, here in NC, the leaves are starting to yellow, and there’s been a definte fall feel in the air.

  33. David says:

    Tomatoes came in good this year but because had to rotate not as many as last. Still have Cherokee purples & chocolates coming & of course sweet & Russian Koralik cherry matoes. Trying some white & zebra green & eggplants still coming on. Also trying 2nd round of cukes & true Delicata squash & first round of Trumpeta squash. Noticing this year praying mantis in garden & powdery white mold. This year made sure my fennel volunteers grew flowers to attract beneficials & got many ladybugs & wasps to help fight off pests :).

    Got two batches of marinara sauce & 6 loaves of zucchini bread. Will have some limas coming soon & last harvest of corn.

    Just heard in Star News of medfly finds in Lakewood, Arcadia & San Marino. Hope no spraying again.

  34. David says:

    Tomatoes came in good this year but because had to rotate not as many as last. Still have Cherokee purples & chocolates coming & of course sweet & Russian Koralik cherry matoes. Trying some white & zebra green & eggplants still coming on. Also trying 2nd round of cukes & true Delicata squash & first round of Trumpeta squash. Noticing this year praying mantis in garden & powdery white mold. This year made sure my fennel volunteers grew flowers to attract beneficials & got many ladybugs & wasps to help fight off pests :).

    Got two batches of marinara sauce & 6 loaves of zucchini bread. Will have some limas coming soon & last harvest of corn.

    Just heard in Star News of medfly finds in Lakewood, Arcadia & San Marino. Hope no spraying again.

  35. Kathy Webster-Link says:

    Here in Middle Tennessee, USA we have had cool nights and low humidity. Very unusual for this time of year, but nice to sleep with the windows open. Tomatoes have been very slow, but green beans, purple hulls, etc. have gone crazy! Not much rain again this year. I can’t decide if the trees are turning due to lack of water or cool evenings. The days are still getting up in the 80’s and 90’s. I love it, but DH does stone work outside all day long and it is really wearing on him. I’m looking forward to Fall and a larger garden in the Spring.

  36. Kathy Webster-Link says:

    Here in Middle Tennessee, USA we have had cool nights and low humidity. Very unusual for this time of year, but nice to sleep with the windows open. Tomatoes have been very slow, but green beans, purple hulls, etc. have gone crazy! Not much rain again this year. I can’t decide if the trees are turning due to lack of water or cool evenings. The days are still getting up in the 80’s and 90’s. I love it, but DH does stone work outside all day long and it is really wearing on him. I’m looking forward to Fall and a larger garden in the Spring.

  37. KK says:

    I’ve commented in past posts about how strange the weather has been this year here in N. CA….Dry winds almost daily. Some crops are doing fine, others are hurting. And even several weeks ago, the nights felt like Fall nights…Lately it is showing in the yellowing leaves on my walnut and fig trees…so I’m expecting an early Fall. I’ll have to brag that my heirloom brandywine tomatoes are fantastic this year, and its the biggest crop ever for me! I attribute this to starting from seed, and digging in year old aged compost which had lots of worm castings in it. Deep watering, and lots of hay mulch too. It’s also been the summer for nectarines, peaches, and apples. I don’t grow any, but my neighborhood has an abundance, so bartering with veggies is always helpful. I also hunt for trees in abandoned areas, or in people’s yards that aren’t getting picked, and ask if I can pick….Just look around your neighborhoods…there’s lots of goodies that fall on the ground. My motto is don’t let it go to waste!!

  38. KK says:

    I’ve commented in past posts about how strange the weather has been this year here in N. CA….Dry winds almost daily. Some crops are doing fine, others are hurting. And even several weeks ago, the nights felt like Fall nights…Lately it is showing in the yellowing leaves on my walnut and fig trees…so I’m expecting an early Fall. I’ll have to brag that my heirloom brandywine tomatoes are fantastic this year, and its the biggest crop ever for me! I attribute this to starting from seed, and digging in year old aged compost which had lots of worm castings in it. Deep watering, and lots of hay mulch too. It’s also been the summer for nectarines, peaches, and apples. I don’t grow any, but my neighborhood has an abundance, so bartering with veggies is always helpful. I also hunt for trees in abandoned areas, or in people’s yards that aren’t getting picked, and ask if I can pick….Just look around your neighborhoods…there’s lots of goodies that fall on the ground. My motto is don’t let it go to waste!!

  39. JoyfulHomemaker says:

    We are in Australia and we are just finishing up Winter going into Spring here and its been a funny winter here..we have had some of the coldest days in 40 yrs yet at the same time its been a very mild winter

  40. JoyfulHomemaker says:

    We are in Australia and we are just finishing up Winter going into Spring here and its been a funny winter here..we have had some of the coldest days in 40 yrs yet at the same time its been a very mild winter

  41. Sinfonian says:

    It’s been rainy with highs in the low 60s when we should be in the high 70s to low 80s every day. So much for a vacation, hehe.

    My corn isn’t liking it, and you’d think some more of those green tomatoes would ripen on the vine. Ah well. Live and learn. At least my potatoes should be loving life.

    And I don’t expect a hot September. I think it’ll be more of the same until fall officially starts. That’d be Seattle weather for you.

  42. Sinfonian says:

    It’s been rainy with highs in the low 60s when we should be in the high 70s to low 80s every day. So much for a vacation, hehe.

    My corn isn’t liking it, and you’d think some more of those green tomatoes would ripen on the vine. Ah well. Live and learn. At least my potatoes should be loving life.

    And I don’t expect a hot September. I think it’ll be more of the same until fall officially starts. That’d be Seattle weather for you.

  43. Janice K says:

    I’m gambling on a hot Indian Summer fall as well, just planted some Brandywine Tomatoes and the Zucchini, Melon, Pole Bean and Cucumber seedlings are in the ground. Nappa Cabbages are in the ground just in case we do have a cool fall. Hopefully something wi ll like this weird weather. We’ll see if it’ll be a hot or cold one… It’s so hard to tell! The persimmons look like they might be changing colors soon. They usually are ready for picking in Oct. As soon as it gets cooler it usually ripens up. I’m really new to this whole canning business. I just hope I don’t get my family ill or worse with botulism or the like.

  44. Janice K says:

    I’m gambling on a hot Indian Summer fall as well, just planted some Brandywine Tomatoes and the Zucchini, Melon, Pole Bean and Cucumber seedlings are in the ground. Nappa Cabbages are in the ground just in case we do have a cool fall. Hopefully something wi ll like this weird weather. We’ll see if it’ll be a hot or cold one… It’s so hard to tell! The persimmons look like they might be changing colors soon. They usually are ready for picking in Oct. As soon as it gets cooler it usually ripens up. I’m really new to this whole canning business. I just hope I don’t get my family ill or worse with botulism or the like.

  45. Patrice Farmer says:

    We had only two months of summer. We had a very strange May thru June that was more like March to May. Then we had June/July that was more like a mild summer and now in August, it’s fall…we’ve even had leaves falling. Fortunately I’ve planted fall/winter veggies. But my tomatoes are all green only. I got nothing out of my yellow squash, and barely any green beans. My collards and cabbage are doing well as are all the other fall veggies. But, I was dissapointed in my zucchini and green beans.

    P.F. in Michigan

  46. Patrice Farmer says:

    We had only two months of summer. We had a very strange May thru June that was more like March to May. Then we had June/July that was more like a mild summer and now in August, it’s fall…we’ve even had leaves falling. Fortunately I’ve planted fall/winter veggies. But my tomatoes are all green only. I got nothing out of my yellow squash, and barely any green beans. My collards and cabbage are doing well as are all the other fall veggies. But, I was dissapointed in my zucchini and green beans.

    P.F. in Michigan

  47. ZippityDooDah says:

    I am in the Southwest in a high elevation zone 6 and I still do not have any ripe tomatoes. My butternut squash is beginning to set fruit. I think I counted 8 this morning. I’m hoping for a lot more. My green beans are starting but have been very slow this year. I have 3 Cocozelle zuchinni that are doing decently.

    A friend commented that our autumn winds have started. I hope not quite yet. I saw a sign for local corn today.

  48. ZippityDooDah says:

    I am in the Southwest in a high elevation zone 6 and I still do not have any ripe tomatoes. My butternut squash is beginning to set fruit. I think I counted 8 this morning. I’m hoping for a lot more. My green beans are starting but have been very slow this year. I have 3 Cocozelle zuchinni that are doing decently.

    A friend commented that our autumn winds have started. I hope not quite yet. I saw a sign for local corn today.

  49. Sue says:

    I’m really grateful others noticed “slowness” with the tomatoes. I was trying to figure out what I did wrong this year. We’ve been getting tomatoes, but minimally. Usually I am putting up tomatoes and this year I’ve barely got enough to put in a daily salad.

    What is doing great– APPLES!!! This is the biggest glut of apples I’ve ever had. We only have one mature tree and it was loaded. They are all picked now. I had to give away bushels and bushels because I just couldn’t keep up with them. I used to have four trees but the other trees got ripped out by a tornado and left only this single tree mature enough to bare apples. Only one year before did I have this level of overabundance and that was when all four trees were bearing at the same time. I’ve never had one tree go crazy like this. BTW I do have baby trees planted to replace the tornadoed trees. So maybe overabundance will be common in my future.

  50. Sue says:

    I’m really grateful others noticed “slowness” with the tomatoes. I was trying to figure out what I did wrong this year. We’ve been getting tomatoes, but minimally. Usually I am putting up tomatoes and this year I’ve barely got enough to put in a daily salad.

    What is doing great– APPLES!!! This is the biggest glut of apples I’ve ever had. We only have one mature tree and it was loaded. They are all picked now. I had to give away bushels and bushels because I just couldn’t keep up with them. I used to have four trees but the other trees got ripped out by a tornado and left only this single tree mature enough to bare apples. Only one year before did I have this level of overabundance and that was when all four trees were bearing at the same time. I’ve never had one tree go crazy like this. BTW I do have baby trees planted to replace the tornadoed trees. So maybe overabundance will be common in my future.

  51. Di says:

    Well thank heavens! I started my veggie garden this year and thought my lack of harvest was due to beginner mistakes! There has been a few of those but even I noticed the weird weather. Here in So Cal it’s June in August! Odd crazy weather! I mean usually there are the hot nights, none of those right now.
    I have JUST started to get ripe tomatoes, few radish etc. My corn tasseled last week so a couple more weeks to see if that pollinated.
    I am totally unsure as to whether thats is for summer heat or if we’re going to get more sun in Sept/oct instead. Who knows?

  52. Di says:

    Well thank heavens! I started my veggie garden this year and thought my lack of harvest was due to beginner mistakes! There has been a few of those but even I noticed the weird weather. Here in So Cal it’s June in August! Odd crazy weather! I mean usually there are the hot nights, none of those right now.
    I have JUST started to get ripe tomatoes, few radish etc. My corn tasseled last week so a couple more weeks to see if that pollinated.
    I am totally unsure as to whether thats is for summer heat or if we’re going to get more sun in Sept/oct instead. Who knows?

  53. Cynthia says:

    We receive a delivery from a local co-op farm and the production has been down and tomatoes are meager. Radishes have been small and woody.

    The good news is that I’ve been canning and making jam for the first time ever. I wondered if you had good recipes for figs? Do you can as well as make jam with them? Any ideas for how to make the most of a crazy bumper crop?

  54. Cynthia says:

    We receive a delivery from a local co-op farm and the production has been down and tomatoes are meager. Radishes have been small and woody.

    The good news is that I’ve been canning and making jam for the first time ever. I wondered if you had good recipes for figs? Do you can as well as make jam with them? Any ideas for how to make the most of a crazy bumper crop?

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