CATCHING UP

Wacky Vegetables.  Meet Mr Eggplant

Just when things couldn’t get any busier – it gets busier and weirder. If this year doesn’t beat all!

The weather is still flip flopping – hot a couple days, then cooler.  Leaving us completely flabbergasted and anxious.  Instead of the harvest increasing like normal years, it’s pretty much leveled off – blah, blat.

In the pantry, tomatoes are what’s lacking so if the fall crop doesn’t come in we may have to go to the farmer’s market and buy (sheesh, haven’t had to say that for years) some overripe tomatoes to canning purposes.  Or the other option would be to just do without.

Are any of you facing a similar dilemma?  These days it’s so easy to reach for a lifeline – thanks to grocery stores chock full of food.   I wonder does anybody actually know how to really live off the land – especially in years when the land doesn’t provide enough.

What’s your mindset?   For us,  it’s all about pretending (or thinking) what if all these lifelines in life don’t exist.    When we can get anything we want 24-7 what if nature has other plans?  How did our pioneer counterparts face up to such challenges?

Pretty scary huh?

Coming Soon

Mystery item should be coming in the mail this week.  Something that we urban homesteaders can use here on the ‘stead to reduce our impact.  Stay tune for details and photos!

Weekly Meal Wrap Up

I didn’t get around to snapping photos of what we ate last week.  I’ve been otherwise preoccupied, having so much on my plate – other than food!

SATURDAY

Breakfast – homemade pancakes (made with HG eggs) and homemade, HG strawberry sauce and HG peaches
Dinner – homemade organic flour tortillas with homemade spanish rice (HG tomatoes, peppers, green onions) topped with HG tomatoes, peppers, cilantro and organic cheese

SUNDAY

Breakfast – homemade granola and HG fruit
Lunch –  leftovers from Saturday
Dinner – HG roasted eggplant, tomato salad with HG salad greens

MONDAY

Breakfast – homemade granola and HG fruit
Lunch – out hiking
Dinner – homemade HG herb pizza crust topped with HG roasted eggplant, tomatoes, basil and figs with summer salad with HG greens, dilly beans, cucumber and tomato

TUESDAY

Breakfast – homemade granola and HG fruit
Lunch – HG lima beans with herb sauce and organic CA grown rice
Dinner – summer pasta medley with HG tomatoes, peppers, green onions

WEDNESDAY

Breakfast – homemade granola and homegrown fruit
Lunch – HG lima beans with herb sauce and organic CA grown rice
Dinner -HG avocado and tomato sandwich

THURSDAY

Breakfast – homemade granola and HG fruit
Lunch – HG avocado and tomato sandwich
Dinner – homemade HG herb pizza crust topped with HG roasted eggplant, tomatoes, basil and figs

FRIDAY

Breakfast – homemade granola and HG fruit
Lunch – summer pasta medley with HG tomatoes, peppers, green onions
Dinner – organic whole wheat pasta with homemade tomato sauce with HG tomatoes, peppers & herbs homemade biscuits and leftover bottle of wine from the potluck

:: Field Hand Appreciation ::

GM $10  VC $25  LE $10 donations are greatly aprpeciated.  Thank you.

Comments(18)

  1. KK says:

    This is the year of extremes, for sure…The weather here in Napa has been strange. We just went through a fairly long heat spell (about 5 days or so)after a period of cold early Fall conditions, and tomatoes and figs and squashes all ripened quickly. A lot of people have been complaining about the tomato crop this year, but the heat wave pushed forth a bumper crop all at once! Now the problem of preserving, drying, saucing etc…not enough counter space!!
    I often wonder how vulnerable the modern human is to surviving in hard times. We’ve all been softened up by modern convieniences…but that will change in the coming years as housing, global finance, peak oil, crop failures, climate changes, et al, take their toll on how we live today. It’s so important to learn how to grow food, but it is scary, for it is so hard to grow and preserve enough to actually get you through if there are no “inputs” coming in from outside. Hopefully, we’ll all learn to be good nieghbors again and pull together to help eachother right where we live…and not have to rely so much on long-distance inputs. It aint gonna be easy, for most everything in today’s world is the other way around, and we’re all conditioned and have “cheap oil habits”!!

  2. KK says:

    This is the year of extremes, for sure…The weather here in Napa has been strange. We just went through a fairly long heat spell (about 5 days or so)after a period of cold early Fall conditions, and tomatoes and figs and squashes all ripened quickly. A lot of people have been complaining about the tomato crop this year, but the heat wave pushed forth a bumper crop all at once! Now the problem of preserving, drying, saucing etc…not enough counter space!!
    I often wonder how vulnerable the modern human is to surviving in hard times. We’ve all been softened up by modern convieniences…but that will change in the coming years as housing, global finance, peak oil, crop failures, climate changes, et al, take their toll on how we live today. It’s so important to learn how to grow food, but it is scary, for it is so hard to grow and preserve enough to actually get you through if there are no “inputs” coming in from outside. Hopefully, we’ll all learn to be good nieghbors again and pull together to help eachother right where we live…and not have to rely so much on long-distance inputs. It aint gonna be easy, for most everything in today’s world is the other way around, and we’re all conditioned and have “cheap oil habits”!!

  3. connie in nm says:

    Weather is weird here too. I have a very small garden which has done well. Still a few Roma tomatoes on my 2 plants. Jalenpeno and green chile did not do very well.
    Still getting some zuchinni and patty pan squash. It will take a couple more weeks to eat what I have picked and I have frozen & dried some. Canning will wait til next years garden.

    Want to try and get some fall crops in. Usually I can plant lettuce and since it is mild here, keep a little under bubble wrap and just harvest it as needed.

    I think the pioneers always tried to keep two years of food in case of a crop failure. I know lots of places out here we get a late freeze so fruit trees only produce every few years.

  4. connie in nm says:

    Weather is weird here too. I have a very small garden which has done well. Still a few Roma tomatoes on my 2 plants. Jalenpeno and green chile did not do very well.
    Still getting some zuchinni and patty pan squash. It will take a couple more weeks to eat what I have picked and I have frozen & dried some. Canning will wait til next years garden.

    Want to try and get some fall crops in. Usually I can plant lettuce and since it is mild here, keep a little under bubble wrap and just harvest it as needed.

    I think the pioneers always tried to keep two years of food in case of a crop failure. I know lots of places out here we get a late freeze so fruit trees only produce every few years.

  5. Mrs. Greenhands says:

    Turn Mr. Eggplant over and he’s giving a big thumbs up!

  6. Mrs. Greenhands says:

    Turn Mr. Eggplant over and he’s giving a big thumbs up!

  7. Laurie says:

    It seems to me that in the past, people were ok with eating lots of the same, long-keeping, staple foods for long periods of time. Think rice and beans, cornmeal mush, potatoes. Not very exciting, to be sure. More and more I am coming to realize what a gift is the variety we have in our diets now.

    This season I tried to grow more staple crops such as corn for meal, sweet potatoes, regular potatoes, and dry beans. Even though I’ve been gardening for many years, this was quite a steep learning curve in a bad gardening year. I am dismayed at how much ground space these crops take, how much time they need to grow before harvest, and the myriad of things that can go wrong along the way. Feeding ourselves isn’t easy….but that doesn’t mean I’m going to give up! What I can do for my family matters very much to me…. I’ll keep growing what I am able to, extending harvests, preserving surplus, stocking up against whatever may come, and thanking the Greater Power for everyday miracles (such as sunshine, rain, and potatoes.)

    take care!

  8. Laurie says:

    It seems to me that in the past, people were ok with eating lots of the same, long-keeping, staple foods for long periods of time. Think rice and beans, cornmeal mush, potatoes. Not very exciting, to be sure. More and more I am coming to realize what a gift is the variety we have in our diets now.

    This season I tried to grow more staple crops such as corn for meal, sweet potatoes, regular potatoes, and dry beans. Even though I’ve been gardening for many years, this was quite a steep learning curve in a bad gardening year. I am dismayed at how much ground space these crops take, how much time they need to grow before harvest, and the myriad of things that can go wrong along the way. Feeding ourselves isn’t easy….but that doesn’t mean I’m going to give up! What I can do for my family matters very much to me…. I’ll keep growing what I am able to, extending harvests, preserving surplus, stocking up against whatever may come, and thanking the Greater Power for everyday miracles (such as sunshine, rain, and potatoes.)

    take care!

  9. Beth says:

    Our tomatoes are not coming in as we had hoped. It suddenly got quite cool and many of them are just staying green. I am hoping they will eventually turn. I need them for canning and sauce!!

  10. Beth says:

    Our tomatoes are not coming in as we had hoped. It suddenly got quite cool and many of them are just staying green. I am hoping they will eventually turn. I need them for canning and sauce!!

  11. Sue says:

    I think Laurie hit it on the head– our pioneer ancestors eat some pretty boring meals for long periods of time. Read Laura Ingalls Wilder and see how often they are eating beans, again. I remember a pioneer story of Joseph Smith’s son blessing the food, “Please bless this corn meal mush and send us something better next time.” They didn’t live like that because they wanted to, they didn’t have a choice. We have quite a bit of choice, even in bad harvest years. I know I have more then beans and corn stored in my pantry.

  12. Sue says:

    I think Laurie hit it on the head– our pioneer ancestors eat some pretty boring meals for long periods of time. Read Laura Ingalls Wilder and see how often they are eating beans, again. I remember a pioneer story of Joseph Smith’s son blessing the food, “Please bless this corn meal mush and send us something better next time.” They didn’t live like that because they wanted to, they didn’t have a choice. We have quite a bit of choice, even in bad harvest years. I know I have more then beans and corn stored in my pantry.

  13. Jodi says:

    The weather here in Montana has been totally bizarre this year as well. A long cool spring put everything at least two and a half weeks behind, a hot July, now things are cooling off much earlier than anticipated. I often say that it’s *never* a bad cabbage year in Montana, but I eat my words this year. It’s a bad year for cabbage, kale (our winter staple!), winter squash, and just terrible for tomatoes. But there’s always something: looks like a great year for corn, potatoes, carrots, and onions.

  14. Jodi says:

    The weather here in Montana has been totally bizarre this year as well. A long cool spring put everything at least two and a half weeks behind, a hot July, now things are cooling off much earlier than anticipated. I often say that it’s *never* a bad cabbage year in Montana, but I eat my words this year. It’s a bad year for cabbage, kale (our winter staple!), winter squash, and just terrible for tomatoes. But there’s always something: looks like a great year for corn, potatoes, carrots, and onions.

  15. redclay says:

    I brought in another batch of green beans the other day. My wife said “More?!” So yeah, I think we all have gotten used to an extremeloy varied diet.

    My tomato plants have been virtually empty all summer, but now they have kicked it into high gear. I just hope that they can all ripen before the cool weather slows them down.

  16. redclay says:

    I brought in another batch of green beans the other day. My wife said “More?!” So yeah, I think we all have gotten used to an extremeloy varied diet.

    My tomato plants have been virtually empty all summer, but now they have kicked it into high gear. I just hope that they can all ripen before the cool weather slows them down.

  17. Albertine says:

    Here in MO the spring was long, wet & cool. The summer hot & exceedingly humid. Most of the tomato & pepper crops were stricken with what I think might have been bacterial black spot. The jalapeno peppers seem to have been resistant. How many jalapenos can one eat? Fortunately last year was a bumper crop of both, still have plenty of jars of salsa & tomato sauce and bags of dried principe borghese, and 13 gallon bags of frozen bell peppers, plenty for our family through the winter & a few to give away. On the up side cukes and spaghetti squash were prolific.

  18. Albertine says:

    Here in MO the spring was long, wet & cool. The summer hot & exceedingly humid. Most of the tomato & pepper crops were stricken with what I think might have been bacterial black spot. The jalapeno peppers seem to have been resistant. How many jalapenos can one eat? Fortunately last year was a bumper crop of both, still have plenty of jars of salsa & tomato sauce and bags of dried principe borghese, and 13 gallon bags of frozen bell peppers, plenty for our family through the winter & a few to give away. On the up side cukes and spaghetti squash were prolific.

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