ABOUT THE WEATHER

Planting hope, another round of summer crops

A cold front blew through on Saturday, bringing with it colder temperatures (30 degree drop) and even a bit of rain.  Temperatures will start climbing once again and by Wednesday we should be baking again with temperatures in the mid 90’s.

This year, we’ve gone through so many flip flop changes in the weather leaves on feeling a bit whiplashed.  Of course the harvest suffered considerably thanks to the weather that couldn’t make up it’s mind.

We started the year on a high note, we high expectations but are now resigned to the fact that the weather has had the last word on this year’s growing season.  We will not, I repeat NOT grow for 10k this year – unless some sort of last second “hail mary” of a miracle happens during these last minutes of the 4th quarter.

The September harvest were the WORST we’ve had in a long time. The economic downturn and our pathetic harvest have hit simultaneously.   I mean, even I was shocked to see the tally results.  Pssst, all you Tally Hoe contestants, I’m giving you hints here!

Like I said in previous post (below), we’ve had “bad” years before but this one takes the cake and our business has suffered because of it and we are now having to start cutting back on “unnessaries”   Asking ourselves “do we really need this” and “can we do without” or “what cheaper alternative is there for this or that.”

Of course we’ve always lived pretty simply but now are having to make what little income we’ve made and have it go further. One thing that won’t suffer is our PTF outeach work, we put this work above our personal needs and wants.

How are you changing your lifestyle during these difficult times?  Are you cutting back or what are doing without?

:: Field Hand Appreciation :: GM $10 donation.  Thanks to your support we are able to offer you sites like our new (hopping) social network for modern victory gardeners… and more to come!

Comments(16)

  1. Susy says:

    Our business is doing better than ever this year, but that doesn’t mean that we’re living it up. We’re always trying to find ways to do more with less and do without. We love that we can give more to those around the world because of our sacrifices. This year we are donating our excess to help educate poor children in Colombia, S.A.

  2. Susy says:

    Our business is doing better than ever this year, but that doesn’t mean that we’re living it up. We’re always trying to find ways to do more with less and do without. We love that we can give more to those around the world because of our sacrifices. This year we are donating our excess to help educate poor children in Colombia, S.A.

  3. Monica says:

    Absolutely planning on doing without, and planning on more economic downturns.

    Thanks for this site. It is such an amazing and extensive resource.

  4. Monica says:

    Absolutely planning on doing without, and planning on more economic downturns.

    Thanks for this site. It is such an amazing and extensive resource.

  5. Carmen says:

    I have had food storage for quite a while that I did not use much. Now, I feel, is the time. I have cut down my food budget to $45.00 a month (eggs, milk, cheese and an occasional luxury item such as an avocado). I grow vegetables and fruits. I am eating healthier than before and I am not going hungry. I spend $5 more a month for food for my two cats. I am keeping my house at only 60 degrees and have cut down on water and electricity use. I live in Minnesota so the bulk of my budget, after my small mortgage, will go to heating. I am paying down all debt in the next three years. My only income is Social Security and I feel happier than ever before.

  6. Carmen says:

    I have had food storage for quite a while that I did not use much. Now, I feel, is the time. I have cut down my food budget to $45.00 a month (eggs, milk, cheese and an occasional luxury item such as an avocado). I grow vegetables and fruits. I am eating healthier than before and I am not going hungry. I spend $5 more a month for food for my two cats. I am keeping my house at only 60 degrees and have cut down on water and electricity use. I live in Minnesota so the bulk of my budget, after my small mortgage, will go to heating. I am paying down all debt in the next three years. My only income is Social Security and I feel happier than ever before.

  7. PhoenixJen says:

    Dear Dervaes Family:

    I’m sorry that the weather has harmed your harvest and your business to the extent that it has. We’ve had the hot/cold/hot/cold thing going on here in Phoenix as well! Only hardy natives seem unfazed. Oh, and a Delicata squash that’s taken over my front yard….

    I do want to extend a huge “thank you” to your family. Because of your work, many of us in Phoenix (and many other places) are more prepared than we would have been otherwise to meet our food needs and conserve on energy, water and other waste in these trying times. Sometimes your Journal is the brightest spot in my day. You’ve started a global revolution and following your family through good times and bad – and learning from your experiences – is more important now than ever.

    Thank you!
    PhoenixJen

  8. PhoenixJen says:

    Dear Dervaes Family:

    I’m sorry that the weather has harmed your harvest and your business to the extent that it has. We’ve had the hot/cold/hot/cold thing going on here in Phoenix as well! Only hardy natives seem unfazed. Oh, and a Delicata squash that’s taken over my front yard….

    I do want to extend a huge “thank you” to your family. Because of your work, many of us in Phoenix (and many other places) are more prepared than we would have been otherwise to meet our food needs and conserve on energy, water and other waste in these trying times. Sometimes your Journal is the brightest spot in my day. You’ve started a global revolution and following your family through good times and bad – and learning from your experiences – is more important now than ever.

    Thank you!
    PhoenixJen

  9. gerry medland says:

    Hi Anais!
    The weather here in the UK continues to follow no pattern other than a continual shifting one,usually wet,wet again,bright,then wet again!!I talk to other folk like ourselves who have seen their harvests cut back again this year.
    the common thread in all of these conversations is the renewed appearance of ‘blight’,this is a very worrying time as we too have become dependent on using our homegrown to sustain and enrich our diets throughout the winter months.
    As in America,so in the UK! Financial chaos is causing deep concern in sensible minds yet apathy in many.What happened to the indomitable English spirit of no surrender?I am seeing my pension eaten up before my eyes on an almost daily basis,I continue to re-evaluate what my modest income will allow me to purchase.I already live a ‘frugal life’ through choice and informed thinking thanks to PTF guidelines,it is a major challenge now to survive the coming storm.Utilities are set to rocket by another 40% this winter,It is a system in abandonment by our politicians,and those with financial oversight of the banking system.
    As an ex military man I have to ask myself,when I remember all who paid the ‘ultimate price’ on behalf of those who remain,’WAS IT WORTH IT? However,I believe that we WILL survive and be more experienced in living the ‘PTF’ way,perhaps a little lighter in weight,but with renewed hope in our hearts to continue to help others make ‘the change’ and their first steps on their ‘PTF’
    Blessings from a weatherbeaten UK,
    gerry m x

  10. gerry medland says:

    Hi Anais!
    The weather here in the UK continues to follow no pattern other than a continual shifting one,usually wet,wet again,bright,then wet again!!I talk to other folk like ourselves who have seen their harvests cut back again this year.
    the common thread in all of these conversations is the renewed appearance of ‘blight’,this is a very worrying time as we too have become dependent on using our homegrown to sustain and enrich our diets throughout the winter months.
    As in America,so in the UK! Financial chaos is causing deep concern in sensible minds yet apathy in many.What happened to the indomitable English spirit of no surrender?I am seeing my pension eaten up before my eyes on an almost daily basis,I continue to re-evaluate what my modest income will allow me to purchase.I already live a ‘frugal life’ through choice and informed thinking thanks to PTF guidelines,it is a major challenge now to survive the coming storm.Utilities are set to rocket by another 40% this winter,It is a system in abandonment by our politicians,and those with financial oversight of the banking system.
    As an ex military man I have to ask myself,when I remember all who paid the ‘ultimate price’ on behalf of those who remain,’WAS IT WORTH IT? However,I believe that we WILL survive and be more experienced in living the ‘PTF’ way,perhaps a little lighter in weight,but with renewed hope in our hearts to continue to help others make ‘the change’ and their first steps on their ‘PTF’
    Blessings from a weatherbeaten UK,
    gerry m x

  11. Sinfonian says:

    So sorry to hear about your worst poundage, but it does not surprise me that the generosity of fellow FGers got you what you needed for a fair trade/price. I have already effectively traded crops with a fellow local FGer and created a great buddy relationship out of it!

    I concur with Gerry m x, the PNW climate most closely resembles the UK, and we’ve had the same blight and powdery mildew, but that’s ok.

    I am in the banking industry, so I know just how bad it is here. Thankfully I’m as safe as you can be, which is good for my family, but we will all be dragged down by those individuals and companies that made poor decisions. That said, we’ve cut back about as much as can be done without being very inconvenient or painful to my family, several years ago to be financially free in the next 4 years. Of course, if things get bad, we can cut back more easily enough. I’m good at budgeting/cutting. hehe.

    The garden is nowhere near the point of feeding us, but I have heard that to feed a salad a day and a veggie at dinner should be a goal, and we’re doing at least that.

    Thank you for all you do!

  12. Sinfonian says:

    So sorry to hear about your worst poundage, but it does not surprise me that the generosity of fellow FGers got you what you needed for a fair trade/price. I have already effectively traded crops with a fellow local FGer and created a great buddy relationship out of it!

    I concur with Gerry m x, the PNW climate most closely resembles the UK, and we’ve had the same blight and powdery mildew, but that’s ok.

    I am in the banking industry, so I know just how bad it is here. Thankfully I’m as safe as you can be, which is good for my family, but we will all be dragged down by those individuals and companies that made poor decisions. That said, we’ve cut back about as much as can be done without being very inconvenient or painful to my family, several years ago to be financially free in the next 4 years. Of course, if things get bad, we can cut back more easily enough. I’m good at budgeting/cutting. hehe.

    The garden is nowhere near the point of feeding us, but I have heard that to feed a salad a day and a veggie at dinner should be a goal, and we’re doing at least that.

    Thank you for all you do!

  13. Cynthia (Geogal17) says:

    I too am thankful for everything I have learned thru this site and FG, I have a pantry full of homgrown and homecanned tomatos, squash, green beans, peppers, jams….and your work is the spark that got my inner fire going. I have learned so much thru your and other FGers experiences that I can slepe better knowing I have a little more knoeldge on how to be more self sufficient. I am so proud of all you have accomplished and by your humble work have touched so many lives. As hard as these economic times are seeing how simply you live and make it work gives me hope that we could waaaaaay cut back and still be happy and living healthily. Again Thank You.

  14. Cynthia (Geogal17) says:

    I too am thankful for everything I have learned thru this site and FG, I have a pantry full of homgrown and homecanned tomatos, squash, green beans, peppers, jams….and your work is the spark that got my inner fire going. I have learned so much thru your and other FGers experiences that I can slepe better knowing I have a little more knoeldge on how to be more self sufficient. I am so proud of all you have accomplished and by your humble work have touched so many lives. As hard as these economic times are seeing how simply you live and make it work gives me hope that we could waaaaaay cut back and still be happy and living healthily. Again Thank You.

  15. redclay says:

    I’m tempted to feel some impending “doom and gloom” about the current state of economic affairs. However, I was really struck last night though that gardening is inherently an optimistic endeavor. I planted some wheat seeds last night as a cover crop on some beds that I just turned over. I thought about the fact that the seeds that I was sowing would make a great loaf of fresh bread. But if I was short-sighted and ground them up into flour, they would never become anything more. By planting the seeds I’m optimistic that they will do me more good in the future and that I will see a return on my investment.

    As a community of gardeners who pursue a simple lifestyle, we should never get lost in the gloomy forecasts. We understand that there will be good years and bad years. Sometimes it’s our fault and sometimes it’s not. We learn, move on and try not to repeat the mistake. We pray as if everything depends on the Lord and we work like everything depends on us.

    Thank you to the Dervaes family for having the optimism and determination to share your lifestyle. Through your simple sharing you have taught us much.

  16. redclay says:

    I’m tempted to feel some impending “doom and gloom” about the current state of economic affairs. However, I was really struck last night though that gardening is inherently an optimistic endeavor. I planted some wheat seeds last night as a cover crop on some beds that I just turned over. I thought about the fact that the seeds that I was sowing would make a great loaf of fresh bread. But if I was short-sighted and ground them up into flour, they would never become anything more. By planting the seeds I’m optimistic that they will do me more good in the future and that I will see a return on my investment.

    As a community of gardeners who pursue a simple lifestyle, we should never get lost in the gloomy forecasts. We understand that there will be good years and bad years. Sometimes it’s our fault and sometimes it’s not. We learn, move on and try not to repeat the mistake. We pray as if everything depends on the Lord and we work like everything depends on us.

    Thank you to the Dervaes family for having the optimism and determination to share your lifestyle. Through your simple sharing you have taught us much.

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