FOOD & MEMORY

Suncrest is one of the last remaining truly juicy peaches. When you wash that treasure under a stream of cooling water, your fingertips distinctively search for that gushy side of the fruit, your mouth waters in anticipation, you lean over the sink to make sure you don’t drip on yourself. Then the juice trickles down your cheeks and dangles on your chin. This is a real bite, a primal act, a magical sensory celebration announcing summer has arrived.

….Memory can become a tool of social action, because the more that people commit to memory, the greater the value that’s achieved. Memory is my greatest marketing tool, and when it’s working you begin to save family farms. If twenty percent of the nation ate from their memories, with that memory satisfied by the wonderful taste and flavor, it would save all family farms. Just think of the revolution in organics if people started eating with that memory, and understanding the depth of that memory.

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Once you’ve tasted homegrown, fresh produce — there’s really no turning back. It’s amazing how taste and smell bring back strong vivid memories — there’s fond ones of picking massive ears of sweet corn from giant stalks and sitting under an oak tree and eating the corn raw — with food there’s certainly a strong bond with the past.

It wasn’t that long ago that the majority of Americans had these “magical sensory celebrations.”

GIVE GREASE A CHANCE

Pasadena man incorporates used vegetable oil to produce homemade, cleaner burning biodiesel fuel.

Though he drives his 1988 Chevrolet Suburban quite frequently, Jules has no plans to visit a filling station anytime soon. Perhaps never. He hasn’t been to one in about 70 days. He’s got his own “gas station” in his garage, dispensing fuel for his veggie-powered diesel engine.

Dervaes, 57, of Pasadena, brews his own biodiesel fuel from a still-like device he built of a water heater a few months ago…

Home fueling station

… Dervaes’ workshop has formulas scrawled on the chalkboard and bottles of biodiesel in its various stages lining a table. It looks as if it could be part of a weird scientific experiment conducted by “Back to the Future’s” Emmett ‘Doc’ Brown, minus the time-traveling DeLorean.

…”This felt like we were doing something that we could be in control and be doing something useful.” he said “We see it as green, helping us out, saving money.”

Courtesy Pasadena Star News “MotorWay” section (they didn’t put it online- so unable to link to entire article).

We are hosting another biodiesel mixer this afternoon — the Biodiesel Mixer is one of our most popular events.

   Moonshadow playing peek-a-boo        Miss Clementine                     Miss Dixie

WEST NILE

On the local news yesterday it was reported that there was afirst case of WN in Pasadena. We’ve been taking precautions, all the standing water has been emptied, or changed daily.

Besides us, anyone of our animals are at risk of coming down with the disease – so JM is keeping a watchful eye for any signs.

DOG DAYS OF SUMMER

It’s back to hot again!   Didn’t think we could escape the summer heat for long — though the cool days were nice while they lasted.

The garden is undergoing a mid-summer transition. So it’s out with the old and in with the new — another round of tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, squash and greens — should last us till at least Sept/October. Then it’s time for the fall/winter crops to be planted.

The peppers are looking great – we really like the red marconi peppers as they seem to do well, better than the bells. On the fruit front, the figs are ripening, can’t eat them all at once, so freezing as many as possible.

The tomato crop this year was better than last — we harvested the same amount (near 800 lbs) with less plants. Wonder if all that compost tea helped — especially with the finicky heirlooms?

Now that the big heirloom tomato “cash crop” is down to mere dribble and the edible flowers (nasturtiums and pansies) have all but faded and dried to a crisp – the next few months are going to be pretty lean in income that comes from the garden.

After the rush of SolFest and Robina — we are hoping to take a break sometime in Sept/Oct and figure out how to implement the path we want to take next.

Weather Report: HOT – It’s going to be a scorcher!

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